School policies and academic guidelines can be found in the Student Handbook.

Required Pharm.D. Courses – Class of 2019 and after: http://pharmacy.unc.edu/academics/the-pharmd/curriculum/

Required Pharm.D. Courses – Class of 2018 and previous is listed below.

PHCY 203: Physiology

  • Pre-requisite: PY1 status.
  • 4 credit hours, Persky (DPET), Fall.

This is a general course in mammalian physiology with emphasis on the various organ systems and their interrelationships. Course consists of three lecture and two recitation hours per week.

PHCY 401: Pharmaceutical Care Lab I

  • Prerequisite: PY1 status.
  • 2 credit hours, Dinkins (PACE), Fall.

Introduction to the “languages and tools” used in contemporary pharmacy practice with emphasis on medical terminology, calculations, communication, drug information, product formulation, and problem-solving. Course is conducted in small group format.

PHCY 402: Pharmaceutical Care Lab II

  • Prerequisite: PHCY 401; co-requisite: PHCY 442.
  • 3 credit hours, Anksorus (PACE), Spring.

Continuation of PHCY 401. This course has additional emphasis on patient interaction and assessment; medication safety and administration; sterile products and compounding; and professional interaction and interdependence.

PHCY 403: Pharmaceutical Care Lab III

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 401, 402; co-requisites: PHCY 433, 443, 445.
  • 2 credit hours, Scolaro (PACE), Fall.

Continuation of PHCY 402. This course emphasizes patient assessment, care planning, and monitoring through lab activities that parallel topics I concurrent pharmacotherapy and literature evaluation courses.

PHCY 404: Pharmaceutical Care Lab IV

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 401, 402, 403; co-requisites: PHCY 444, 446, 452.
  • 2 credit hours, Dinkins (PACE), Spring.

Continuation of PHCY 403, with activities parallel topics in concurrent pharmacotherapy and nonprescription drug courses, with emphasis on patient assessment, care planning, and monitoring; self-care practices and verbal communication skills.

PHCY 405: Pharmaceutical Care Lab V

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 401, 402, 403, 404; co-requisites: PHCY 447, 449.
  • 2 credit hours, Anksorus (PACE), Fall.

Continuation of PHCY 404 activities with an emphasis on the concurrent infectious diseases and hematology/oncology pharmacotherapy course material. Emphasis on patient care in regards to case note writing, evidence based medicine principles, compounding, drug information retrieval, profile reviews, aseptic technique and counseling skills. Students will continue to develop presentation and literature analysis skills through the new drug update presentations and to incorporate drug literature analysis techniques via the journal club discussions.

PHCY 410: Basic Pharmaceutics I

  • Prerequisite: PY1 status.
  • 3 credit hours, Jay (MOPH), Fall.

Physicochemical principles underlying the properties and design of liquid, solid, and semisolid dosage forms and their applications to pharmacy practice.

PHCY 411: Basic Pharmaceutics II

  • Prerequisite: PY1 status.
  • 3 credit hours, Mumper (MOPH), Spring.

Introduction to pharmaceutical dosage forms, including their production, evaluation, and quality assurance, including radiopharmaceuticals.

PHCY 412: Principles of Pharmacodynamics

  • Prerequisite: PY1 status.
  • 3 credit hours, P. Smith (MOPH), Spring.

Overview of how drug-protein interactions influence systemic drug disposition, drug concentrations at the site of action, and pharmacologic response.

PHCY 413: Foundations in Pharmacokinetics

  • Prerequisite: PY2 status.
  • 3 credit hours, Persky (DPET), Fall.

Principles underlying the disposition of drugs in the human body, with emphasis on analysis of drug concentration-time information, design of dosage regimens, and factors that influence the kinetics of response.

PHCY 414: Applied Pharmacokinetics

  • Prerequisite: PHCY 413.
  • 3 credit hours, Dupuis (DPET), Spring.

Focus on application of pharmacokinetic principles to individualize drug therapy. Discussions focus on commonly monitored drugs and consider patient-specific parameters, disease processes, drug interactions and therapeutic response (outcome).

PHCY 421: Pharmaceutical Biochemistry I

  • Pre-requisite: PY1 status; co-requisite: PHCY 401.
  • 3 credit hours, A. Lee (CBMC), Fall.

An introductory course examining amino acid/protein, carbohydrate and lipid structure and function in the normal and pathophysiological states. Other topics include: general review of key concepts in organic chemistry, drug-receptor interactions and mechanism of action, protein structure/function, enzyme catalysis and inhibition, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acid. When applicable, drug development and intervention in treating disease states is emphasized. A weekly recitation provides students an opportunity to review and apply information and concepts developed during lectures.

PHCY 422: Pharmaceutical Biochemistry II

  • Pre-requisite: PY1 status; co-requisite: PHCY 402.
  • 3 credit hours, Singleton (CBMC), Spring.

This is an introductory course providing an integrated understanding of nucleic acid structure and nucleotide metabolism as well as a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of gene expression. The course emphasizes the biochemical basis of pathogenesis and drug action including modern biotechnological approaches to drug development and therapeutics (genomics, proteonomics). A recitation section comprised of student presentations on the action and use of cancer and viral therapeutics integrates with PHCY 402.

PHCY 423: Medicinal Chemistry I: Autonomic, Autacoid and Hormones

Pre-requisite: PHCY 421; co-requisites: PHCY 443, 445.

2.5 credit hours, Bowers (CBMC), Fall.

The medicinal chemistry of drugs affecting the pulmonary, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurohormonal, and autonomic nervous systems. For these systems, students are taught to describe and apply to the solution of therapeutic problems, the relationship between the chemical and physicochemical properties of medicinal agents and their molecular mechanism of biological action, absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism.

PHCY 424: Medicinal Chemistry II: Cardiovascular and CNS

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 421 and 422; co-requisites: PHCY 444, 446.
  • 2.5 credit hours, Q. Zhang (CBMC), Spring.

Medicinal chemistry of drugs affecting the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. For these systems, students are taught to describe and apply to the solution of therapeutic problems, the relationship between the chemical and physicochemical properties of medicinal agents and their molecular mechanism of biological action, absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism.

PHCY 425: Medicinal Chemistry III: Cancer and Infectious Diseases

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 421 and 422.
  • 2 credit hours, J. Liu/Jarstfer (CBMC), Fall.

Medicinal chemistry of drugs for treatment of infectious diseases and cancer (oncology). For these systems, students are taught to describe and apply to the solution of therapeutic problems, the relationship between the chemical and physicochemical properties of medicinal agents and their molecular mechanism of biological action, absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism.

PHCY 431: Health Systems

  • Prerequisites: PY1 status.
  • 2 credit hours, Oramasionwu (DPOP), Fall

Introduces first-year students to the U.S. health care system and different practice settings that pharmacists practice. Topics covered include: the history of the U.S. health care system, Medicaid, Medicare, private health insurance, pharmacoeconomics, drug policy, mental health pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry, community health centers, public health pharmacy, hospital pharmacy, and community pharmacy.

PHCY 432: Pharmacy Law and Ethics

  • Prerequisites: PY3 status.
  • 3 credit hours, Sleath (DPOP), Spring.

Comprehensive survey of state and federal statutes, state and federal regulations, and common-law principles that affect the practice of pharmacy. Particular emphasis on the Federal and State Controlled Substance Acts, Federal and State Food, Drug and Cosmetic Acts, the Poison Prevention Packaging Act, the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 and the North Carolina Pharmacy Practice Act. Class discussion and assignments will include the application of ethics and values to fact situations involving the use of drugs in health care.

PHCY 433: Drug Literature Analysis and Interpretation

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 442, PHCY 402; co-requisite: PHCY 403.
  • 4 credit hours, Dupuis (DPET), Fall.

Provides students with a working knowledge of the concepts and methods of clinical drug trials. In addition the course reviews the principles of drug study design and biostatistics. The course blends concepts and principles with discussion of clinically-important articles from the biomedical literature. This course will add to students’ competencies in identifying, analyzing and interpreting literature and assist students in their application of that literature into clinical practice.

PHCY 434:  Managing a Successful Pharmacy Practice

  • Prerequisite: PY3 status.
  • 3 credit hours, Marciniak (PACE), Spring.

This course is designed to introduce students to important and fundamental principles of pharmacy practice management, while providing students an opportunity for more focused, in-depth learning in one of two concentration areas: (1) community pharmacy, (2) pharmacy services in the inpatient health system setting.

PHCY 441: Certificate in Immunization

  • Prerequisite: PY1 status.
  • 1 credit hour, Marciniak (PACE), Spring.

Provides comprehensive immunization education, discusses strategies to develop, implement and maintain pharmacy based immunization services, and provides opportunities to practice administration of subcutaneous and intramuscular injections.

PHCY 442: Pharmacotherapy 1: Introduction to Pharmaceutical Care

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 401, 431; Co-requisite: PHCY 402.
  • 4 credit hours, D. Williams (DPET), Spring.

Introduces students to a systematic approach to patient-centered pharmaceutical care; emphasizes patient assessment, problem-solving, communication, and counseling skills. Begins pharmacotherapy sequence, focusing on assessment and management of rheumatologic & inflammatory disorders.

PHCY 443: Pharmacotherapy 2: Dermatology/Endocrinology:

  • Prerequisites: PY2 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 403, PHCY 423.
  • 3 credit hours, Ives (PACE), Fall.

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of dermatologic and endocrine disorders, with emphasis on chemical and biological basis of disease and therapy, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care plans, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 444: Pharmacotherapy 4: Cardiology/Nephrology

  • Prerequisites: PY2 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 404, PHCY 424.
  • 4 credit hours, J. Rogers (DPET), Spring

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of cardiovascular and renal system disorders, with emphasis on chemical and biological basis of disease and therapy, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care plans, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 445: Pharmacotherapy 3: Pulmonary/Gastroenterology

  • Prerequisites: PY2 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 403, PHCY 423.
  • 2 credit hours, Williams (DPET), Fall.

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of ANS, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal disorders, with emphasis on chemical and biological basis of disease and therapy, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care plans, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 446: Pharmacotherapy 5: Neurology/Psychiatry

  • Prerequisites: PY2 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 404, PHCY 424.
  • 2 credit hours, Burkhart/Hedgepeth (PACE), Spring.

Pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders, with emphasis on chemical and biological basis of disease and therapy, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care plans, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 447: Pharmacotherapy 6: Hematology/Oncology

  • Prerequisites: PY3 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 405, PHCY 425.
  • 3 credit hours, Walko (DPET), Fall.

Pharmacotherapy of hematology and oncology disorders, with emphasis on the biological, chemical, and immunologic basis of disease and therapy, biotechnology applications, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care plans, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 449: Pharmacotherapy 7: Infectious diseases

  • Prerequisites: PY3 status, PHCY 442; co-requisites: PHCY 405, PHCY 425.
  • 3 credit hours, Willliams (DPET), Fall.

Pharmacotherapy of immunologic and infectious disorders, with emphasis on the biological, chemical, and immunologic basis of disease (pathophysiology) and therapy, immunizations, epidemiology, socioeconomic considerations, and developing patient assessment, care-planning, monitoring, and communication skills.

PHCY 450: Pharmacotherapy 8: Problems in Pharmacotherapy

  • Prerequisites: PY3 status, completion of Pharmacotherapy sequence (1-7), PHCY 433.
  • 5 credit hours, Pittman (DPET), Spring.

Conference format with a focus on application and integration of subject matter from prior courses to solving patient-specific problems related to drug therapy. Emphasis on developing clinical problem-solving abilities, including critical appraisal of the literature, patient assessment, formulation of therapeutic goals, and development of pharmacotherapy and monitoring plans.

PHCY 452: Nonprescription Drugs & Self-care

  • Prerequisites: PHCY 442, PY2 status; co-requisites PHCY 404.
  • 3 credit hours, Ferreri (PACE), Spring.

Students will learn how to triage patients for self-care, develop treatment strategies and make appropriate therapeutic non prescription recommendations through lectures, case-based scenarios and projects.

PHCY 461, 462, 464, 465: Professional Development Sequence

  • Prerequisites: None. Co-requisite: Enrollment in PY1 (461, 462), PY2, (464) or PY3 (465) curriculum.
  • 0.5 credit hours each. Leadon (PACE), Fall and Spring.

A four-semester course sequence intended to facilitate student professional development and preparation for their full participation in the experimental component of the curriculum. This course has been designed to provide the foundation that enables students to better assume his/her role as a professional student, and in the future, as a competent pharmacist.

PHCY 470: Introductory Pharmacy Professional Experience (IPPE), Hospital

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of PY1 curriculum.
  • 4.5 credit hours, PACE Faculty & Preceptors (PACE), Summer.

Required rotation between the first and second professional years designed to facilitate students’ continuing professional development in the context of the hospital pharmacy practice setting. Through structured activities and assignments, students will build upon knowledge and skills developed in the first year of the didactic curriculum. Students will continue to explore the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes; formulate a personal philosophy of and approach to life-long learning skills. This experience seeks to provide students with direct exposure to the dynamics of the hospital pharmacy workplace and to guide them to a realistic assessment of the challenges and opportunities that exist therein.

PHCY 471: Introductory Pharmacy Professional Experience (IPPE), Community

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of PY2 curriculum
  • 4.5 credit hours, PACE Faculty & Preceptors (PACE), Summer.

Required rotation between the second and third professional years designed is to facilitate students’ continuing professional development in the context of the community pharmacy setting. Through structured activities and assignments, students will build upon knowledge and skills developed in the first two years of the didactic curriculum and the introductory hospital pharmacy practice experience. Students will continue to explore the concepts of professionalism and shared accountabilities for health care outcomes’ formulate a personal philosophy of and approach to professional practice; expand drug and disease knowledge; and develop practical, critical thinking and life-long learning skills. This experience seeks to provide students with direct exposure to the dynamics of the community pharmacy workplace and to guide them to a realistic assessment of the challenges and opportunities that exists therein.

PHCY 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478, 479, 481, 482, 483, 484: Advanced Pharmacy Professional Experience (APPE)

  • Prerequisite: Successful completion of PY3 curriculum
  • 4 credit Hours, PACE Faculty & Preceptors (PACE) Fall, Spring, Summer.

One of nine required clerkships during the fourth professional year that provides opportunities for students to build upon knowledge and skills acquired through didactic education and Introductory Pharmacy Professional Experiences and apply them in direct patient care activities in both inpatient and ambulatory care and non-traditional pharmacy settings. Students complete 9 calendar months of APPEs during their fourth professional year.

PHCY 491, 492: Advanced Pharmacy Professional Experience / AHEC Seminar

  • Prerequisites: successful completion of PY3 curriculum.
  • 1 credit hour each, PACE Faculty (PACE), Fall, Spring.

Forum for pharmacy faculty to evaluate and provide feedback on students’ formal presentations which they research, develop and deliver using appropriate audiovisual media support and hand

The Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate program in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy is committed to the development of the whole student.  To that end, professional development is promoted, encouraged, and celebrated. We strive for our students to reach their maximum potential beyond the classroom and the lab bench. Through skill development opportunities, our students put themselves in position to succeed as leaders and well-rounded citizens.


Activities and Events

Resources

Ph.D. required courses can be found within each Division’s program information.

2014-2016 Curriculum

Fall Year 1 Credit
Hours
PACE 815 Evaluation Research and Project Design (McLaughlin) 3
PACE 820 Health-System Pharmacy Leadership (Cox / Daniels) 3
PHRS 899 Seminar 1
PHRS 991 Research in PACE 3
Cumulative Total 10
Spring Year 1
PACE 833 Overview to Health Systems (Dedrick / Decoske) 3
PACE 825 Foundational Practices of a Successful Health-System Department of Pharmacy
(Kessler / Wolfe / Forshay)
3
3
PHRS 899 Seminar 1
PHRS 991 Research in PACE 3
Cumulative Total 20
Fall Year 2
PACE 860 Advanced Hospital Pharmacy Operations (Eckel) 3
PHRS 899 Seminar 1
PHRS 993 Thesis Substitute 3
Cumulative Total 27
Spring Year 2
PACE 832 Financial Management of Health-system Pharmacy (Wernoski / Bush) 3
PHRS 899 Seminar 1
PHRS 993 Thesis Substitute 3
Grand Total 34

Course Descriptions

PACE 815 Evaluation Research and Project Design: This course provides formal instruction on critical components of evaluation research, study design, and data analyses that a Master in Pharmaceutical Sciences with a specialization in health system pharmacy administration graduate will need in the workplace.

PACE 820 Health-System Pharmacy Leadership: This course focuses on principles of leadership and strategies used by leaders, with an emphasis in health-system pharmacy. Active learning strategies are used to examine and model leadership principles.

PACE 825 Foundational Practices of a Successful Health-System Department of Pharmacy: This course will focus on the Foundational Practices of a Successful Health-System Department of Pharmacy. Topics covered include medication safety, pharmacy informatics, and human resources management.

PACE 832 Financial Management of Health-system Pharmacy: This course provides an overview of the current financial environment in the health care industry and is intended to familiarize students with general accounting principles and financial management skills required to lead and manage pharmacy services in a health care organization.

PACE 833 Overview to Health Systems: This course is designed to expose participants to real world issues facing health system pharmacy leaders and to teach participants to work through concepts, processes, and challenges that are and will be faced.

PACE 860 Advanced Hospital Pharmacy Operations: This course is intended to build on the basic principles of pharmacy operations learned through coursework and experience as professional students as well as work experience.

PHRS 899 Seminar: This course is required for all Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate students. Other students must obtain permission from the divisional course director. Class format consists of seminar presentations by students and/or faculty or invited speakers. Students are expected to actively engage in seminar activities and discussions.

PHRS 991 Research in PACE: This is a variable credit course required for all Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate students by their second semester. Teaching/learning methods consist of a pharmaceutical sciences-based mentored research training experience involving independent work and research reports that must be filed at the end of the semester.

PHRS 993 Thesis Substitute: Prerequisite, PHRS 991 or equivalent. Students register for thesis credits after successfully passing their comprehensive written examination. A minimum of 3 credit hours of thesis research and writing is required for Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate students.


For All Students

For information about designing and costs of printing research posters and to request a poster, visit our poster printing information page.

In accordance with the federal Campus Security Act (also known as the Clery Act), you can find a copy of the University’s annual campus security report by visiting the respective web page below. It contains information on crime and arrest statistics, crime reporting and emergency warning procedures, alcohol and drug policies, sexual assault response procedures, campus police authority and jurisdiction, building security, and educational programs on crime prevention and security.

UNC Chapel Hill Campus Security Reports

To request a paper copy of the report, write to UNC Chapel Hill Security Report, CB# 9150, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-9150.

For more information on the Campus Security Act please visit the Clery Center website.