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Dear Incoming Student:

Welcome to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. We hope that your experience at the School is positive.  We expect the best from our students and we want you to expect the best from us.

The profession of pharmacy plays a vital role in serving the health needs of the people of the United States. Pharmacists are the most accessible members of the health care team for the public and are authorities on drugs and drug usage. With authority comes responsibility, and the goal of our School is to help you become a responsible pharmacist.

This handbook is intended as a welcome to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy for new students and as a source of information for the student body about major policies and procedures within the School. It informs you of our philosophy and defines the rules that guide our actions. We ask for your cooperation by becoming familiar with the contents of the handbook.

Faculty and students form a partnership. They work together in a structured program to produce a finished product that each partner wants: a competent, responsible, and caring pharmacist or pharmaceutical scientist. The PharmD Student Handbook contains guidelines for making this partnership optimally beneficial to you. We hope that you will use this book and benefit from it.

Please take a moment to read the School’s vision and mission before continuing to the handbook.

Vision

To be the preeminent school of pharmacy where leaders in practice, education, and research are developed and nurtured.

Mission

To advance health care through innovation and collaboration in pharmacy practice, education, research, and public service.

We will:

  1. Provide innovative and contemporary educational experiences
  2. Provide the highest quality educational experiences
  3. Develop and evaluate progressive practice models
  4. Create and maintain competitive research programs
  5. Apply new knowledge that contributes to the economic development of North Carolina
  6. Recruit, mentor and retain exceptional faculty, staff, and preceptors
  7. Recruit and mentor exceptional students and trainees who will address the health-care needs of North Carolina.
  8. Deliver and promote postgraduate education and training for career and leadership development
  9. Establish and sustain partnerships, collaborations, and strategic alliances
  10. Embrace and support the network of alumni and professional colleagues across North Carolina
  11. Provide outreach and service to the citizens of North Carolina and beyond
  12. Maintain a culture that values diversity
  13. Foster an environment of creative thought and academic freedom

Please be sure to print and sign the signature page in this handbook.  The signature page should be turned into the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs, 109 Beard Hall within one week of the first day of Orientation.

Thank you and welcome!

Office of Curricular & Student Affairs

Disclaimer: The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy designs this Student Handbook to be as current as possible; however, the policies and other information contained in this handbook are subject to change at any time. The official Student Handbook is maintained in the Office of Professional Education.  In the event of any discrepancy between the online policies and the official Student Handbook, then the language in the official version shall control.

Hours of Operation

  • UNC-Chapel Hill: Beard Hall and Kerr Halls are open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday (Beard and Kerr Halls are locked at 6:00 p.m. on Fridays).
  • UNC-Asheville: Karpen Hall is open from 7:30am to 11pm. Zeis Hall is open from 7:30am to 10pm.
  • All buildings are closed on Saturday and Sunday with the exception of special events.
  • Generally, offices are open from 8am to 5pm Monday through Friday.

Food and Drink Policy

  • No food or drink will be allowed in the following rooms:
    • The student computer rooms
    • Skills Labs
    • Master Classrooms
    • Jenkins Science Center
    • Karpen or Zeis Hall
  • Water in a lidded container may be taken into the above rooms.
  • The policies of faculty and staff offices and laboratories will be under the jurisdiction of the respective faculty and staff assigned to the area.
  • Exceptions may be made for special events. Requests for special consideration should be made at the same time the room is reserved.
  • You are responsible for leaving the rooms neat and clean.

Smoking Policy

UNC-Chapel Hill

The UNC- Chapel Hill campus is smoke free.

Asheville

The University of North Carolina at Asheville is dedicated to maintaining a health working and learning environment. Smoking is currently prohibited inside University buildings, facilities, and residence halls. Smoking is prohibited in all outdoor areas within the University Heights loop around campus, except for areas designated for smoking. Smoking is also prohibited within 100 feet of University buildings, outdoor athletic facilities, and outdoor recreation facilities. The only exception to this 100-foot rule is outside University Residence Halls, where outdoor designated smoking areas may be closer to the building for the purposed of resident safety.

For the purpose of this policy, smoking is defined as burning any type of tobacco product including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, pipes, and bidis.

Reserving Rooms

Rooms are generally available except when classes or labs are meeting. If you want to reserve a room for a student organization, you must contact the Senate secretary. All other requests may be made by visiting this site, where you can view the room schedules and request a reservation.  You will need to be logged into a UNC Chapel Hill wifi or Ethernet network on campus or logged into VPN off campus to use the site. You can find information about setting up VPN here.

UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy web site (pharmacy.unc.edu)

School information, student activities, faculty biographies and a variety of useful links are located here.

UNC Health Sciences Library (962-0800 or www.hsl.unc.edu)

You have access to hundreds of databases, online books, and journals via the Health Sciences Library’s Web site. Your Onyen account will allow you access these resources when you are not on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. When you are on campus, you do not need to login in via Onyen to access resources. The only resource not available off campus is Micromedex.

The Health Sciences Library provides on- and off-campus access to thousands of resources, such as:

  • Citation and full-text literature databases (PubMed MEDLINE, BIOSIS Previews, CINAHL, Chemical Abstracts, Google Scholar, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PsycInfo, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, etc.)
  • Electronic journals (BMJ, JAMA, The Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine, Science, American Journal of Medicine,American Journal of Nursing, American Journal of Health Systems Pharmacy, American Journal of Public Health, Journal of Dentistry, etc.)
  • Electronic books (AHFS Drug Information, Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation, Mosby’s, the Merck Manual, Goodman & Gilman’s, etc.)

In addition to providing access to the resources listed above, the Health Sciences Library provides access to one of the largest collections of print journals and books in the country. Librarians are available to help you with searching databases, managing your citations, creating multimedia projects, and with any other question you may have about information. The HSL also has a number of special services for distance education students, including students attending clerkships. The Library is a safe, quiet place to study with wireless access on all floors, study rooms, and a coffee shop. Asheville based students may visit the Ramsey Library.

Notary Public

There are several notaries public located in the School who can notarize documents free of charge. Please visit the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs to have documents notarized.

Phones

In case of emergency, you may come to the Office of & Curricular & Students Affairs for use of their phone.

Copies

A copier is available at the Health Sciences Library. At UNC-Chapel Hill, payments must be made with UNC One Cards. These can be obtained from the UNC One Card Office (see campus map and general information).  Asheville-based students may visit Karpen Hall Computer Lab (KH 036/037) which has copiers and payments may be made with UNC-A One Cards.

Access to Pharmacy Facilities After Hours

Because a pharmacy student’s day doesn’t always end by 5:00 p.m., students may need access to the building at night. Pharmacy students can enter Kerr Hall at UNC and Karpen/Zeis hall using their One Cards. Students on the ECSU campus can enter the Pharmacy Building using electronic keys assigned during the PY1 year. Students are responsible for other people they let into the building. Doors should never be propped open for someone. Remember to take precautions at night, and try to leave with someone else and keep a watchful eye.

Nearby Eateries

The UNC-Chapel Hill campus has several places close to Beard and Kerr Halls where students can get food. Please check their operating hours, as they are subject to change. They include the Beach Café (located in Brinkhouse-Bullitt), Tar Heal Café (located in Thurston-Bowles), the Global Café (Global Education Building), a snack bar in the Health Affairs Bookstore (located behind Carrington Hall and Berryhill Hall), a coffee shop at the Health Affairs Library, and The Atrium (located in the Hooker Building). Most of these places will accept a UNC One Card, Debit or Credit Card for payment. On the ECSU campus a snack bar and grill is located in the Ridley Student Center and the Blue Room is located adjacent to the Ridley Student Center. On the Asheville campus, there is the UNC-Asheville Dining Hall, UNC-Asheville Food Court and a snack bar in Ramsey Library.

Information Technology is an important part of your education at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. The staff of the School’s IT department (known as ITSOP) will assist you in any way possible with your IT and computing needs within the appropriate guidelines of the University. The University of North Carolina also provides numerous IT and computing resources. We urge you to take advantage of all resources available to you. To reach the ITSOP email your request to ITSOP@unc.edu or visit the ITS website at http://its.unc.edu/.

Information Technology Staff

Chapel Hill
Dave Maldonado, director dave_maldonado@unc.edu 919-843-8071
David Dombek, tech support analyst dombekdm@email.unc.edu 919-843-3885
Deric Freeman, system administrator deric_freeman@unc.edu 919-966-9171
Porschia Holmes, support tech pnholmes@email.unc.edu
Bill Vogt, suport tech wvogt@email.unc.edu

 

For technical assistance with Sakai, Lync, room reservations, equipment reservations or classroom technology, email your request to the educational technology team at techcore@unc.edu.

Educational Technology Staff

Chapel Hill
Al Sarhangi, director al_sarhangi@unc.edu
Victoria Hammett, instructional tech 919-962-0057
Jeremy Smith, tech support jeremy_smith@unc.edu 919-966-0796
Asheville
Ben Halligan halligan@unc.edu 828-250-3909
James Joyce james_joyce@unc.edu 828-250-3909

Computer Labs

Beard Hall:

  • Lab 034 (twelve stations, one scanning station)
  • Lab 202 (three stations, the Compounding Lab)
  • 202D (three stations, VTC classroom)
  • 202E (four stations, VTC classroom)
  • Lab 204 (16 stations, the Pharmaceutical Skills Lab)

Asheville campus

  • Karpen Hall 036/037: computers and OneCard printing
  • Karpen 110 and Quad-level Karpen Lobby: OneCard copier/printer/scanner

All computers have the following software loaded:

  • Windows XP Professional
  • Microsoft Office 2003, and Office 2007 Compatibility Pack (to read docs created in 2007)
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader 7.0
  • Norton’s Antivirus Corporate (updated automatically)
  • Internet Explorer 6.01
  • Mozilla Firefox 3.0 web browser (not at ECSU)
  • WS-FTP (not at ECSU)
  • Mulberry Email 2.3 (not at ECSU)
  • AFS client (mapped to your campus space) (not at ECSU)
  • Real Player 8.0
  • QuickTime 6.0
  • Shockwave Player

All the lab computers are equipped with CD read-write drives and can accommodate DVDs.

Please request any additional software through Dave Maldonaldo at UNC Chapel Hill. Do not add any software to these computers on your own. Also, please do not alter settings or configurations.

Logging on to Lab Computers

To log on to a computer, hold CTRL+ALT+DEL down at the same time, and then enter your Onyen and password at UNC-Chapel Hill. At UNC-Chapel Hill, our login process in the labs automatically “maps” you to your home folders on AFS space. (AFS space further down). Please remember to log off using the log off icon on the desktop or by choosing start/shutdown/log off 201/204___-__. Failure to log off will allow the next user to access your home space and e-mail.

Network Access and Device Registration

All pharmacy classrooms are equipped with network plugs and Beard and Kerr Halls at UNC-Chapel Hill are wireless. To connect your laptops and other mobile device to the wired or wireless network and the Internet, you must register its network card hardware address with campus IT.

For more information on accessing UNC Chapel Hill’s network, visit http://help.unc.edu/help/connecting-to-the-unc-network-getting-started/.

Finding Your Network Card(s) Hardware Address

Instructions on finding your network card(s) hardware address can be found here: http://help.unc.edu/help/connecting-to-the-unc-wired-network/

Registering Your Hardware Address

UNC-Chapel Hill

Write down your hardware address and go to http://onyen.unc.edu. Click DHCP Registration. Log on with your Onyen and follow the instructions to register your hardware address. If you have any questions. dial 962-HELP (962-4357). Once you have registered your hardware address, you can access the Internet from any network plug on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. You will need to furnish your own network cable.

Wifi Access

Directions for connecting to UNC’s wireless network, Eduroam, are available online. If you have questions or need help, please contact itsop@unc.edu.

K Drive Access

You will not be able to access our network (K drive) without the IT staff configuring your machine. If you wish them to do so, e-mail them at itsop@unc.edu.

General Lab Rules

  1. Do not bring food or drinks into the labs
  2. Be considerate of fellow students, and keep noise to a minimum
  3. Do not use lab computers to play games.
  4. Keep web surfing and email maintenance to a minimum.
  5. Report any suspicious activity to an IT staff member. This can be done anonymously

The phones in Lab 204 can be used to call the Information Technology Services Help Desk, 2-HELP (4357). ITS staff members are available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week to answer your computing questions. The ITS main information page can be found at http://help.unc.edu.

Saving Your Data

Every year, students lose very important data, presentation, and files and don’t have a back up for it. Below you will see what is available to you for your data storage needs. Please take advantage of the different ways to save/backup your data. You can’t have enough backups.

Lab Computer Hard Drives

Don’t save anything to the C drive of the lab computers. They will be rebuilt during the semester (sometimes more than once), and everything on them will be erased during rebuild.

AFS Space

Use your AFS space as the main location for storing your files/data. AFS space is file storage space available on the campus network. It is a safe, convenient place to store documents/data because it is backed up every night and accessible from any lab computer in Beard Hall (also all libraries and pubic ITS labs). When you log onto a lab computer click “my computer” then “disconnected network drive H.” Within that space you will see many folders. The “private” folder is where you should save important files/data, and it is only accessible to you. Your initial allocation of space is 100 MB. This space is not only secure but it is archived for ninety days, which means if you delete or need a file from thirty days ago, for example, it can be recovered. If you would like more information on the public folder, which allows you to share files with others, please see an IT member. Failure to log off a lab machine will leave your AFS open to the next user.

USB Flash Drives

USB flash drives provide a compact way to save your files. USB keys can be purchased in numerous sizes. All lab computers come equipped with two USB ports in the front that can be used for USB flash drives. When you insert your flash drive into one of the lab computer, you will see an “F” drive created. Save and delete to your F drive as you would any other drive. When you are done, click the icon in the task tray (bottom right) that looks like an arrow going into a box, then follow the instructions to safely remove your key. You can remove your key without the last step, but you will take a chance of corrupting the data.

K Drive

The K drive is a temporary and public storage space for you that can be accessed by any computer in Beard and Kerr Halls. There is an icon on all the lab computers to the K drive. You may create your own temporary folder on the K drive if you wish. The most popular use of the K drive is to store presentations that are going to be made somewhere else in Beard/Kerr Halls. Groups may also share a folder on the K drive when working on projects where there is a need to share files.

We will periodically delete all files from the K drive that are more than two weeks old. Contact Dave Maldonaldo if you wish to save files longer than two weeks.

Useful Sites and Related Information

UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
www.pharmacy.unc.edu

Campus Computing Policy
https://policies.unc.edu/

This site is contains comprehensive information on all UNC Chapel Hill computing policies, topics covered are too numerous to mention but include ONYEN (email) , security, copyrighted materials and webpage policies.

Please take a few minutes and review this important website, the information will be useful sometime during your time here at the School.

ITS (Information Technology Services)
http://its.unc.edu

ITS is the main campus page for computing questions. There are many useful links on this page, and almost any question you may have about computing on campus can be answered here.

CCI (Carolina Computing Initiative)
https://cci.unc.edu/

This is the site for purchasing laptops and computers at a discounted price. All the computers purchased through CCI come with a fixed software load, three- or four-year warranty, and an insurance policy. CCI offers walk-in service centers. All the UNC labs are equipped with CCI computers. The IT staff recommends CCI computers for those of you planning on purchasing a desktop/laptop.

Help.unc.edu
http://help.unc.edu

Help.unc.edu is part of the ITS group on campus. You may look for answers to problems on this site. They also have a link that enables you to submit a help request (https://www.unc.edu/ar-bin/websub/index.pl). You may also reach the help desk by dialing 2-HELP (4357).

Shareware.unc.edu
http://shareware.unc.edu

As a member of the UNC family, you are entitled to free or very inexpensive software. Visit http://shareware.unc.edu to find out more about the software available to you. One example of very inexpensive software is the site license the campus has with Microsoft Corporation, which allows you to purchase Microsoft Office XP for $15.00 to $25.00 for home or school use.

Overview

Inclement weather sometimes impacts the School’s ability to hold regularly scheduled classes. This policy is intended to provide guiding principles for managing courses during an inclement weather event. This policy is intended to provide equity for students regardless of campus as well as allow the School and its students, faculty, and staff to remain agile during inclement weather events. Ultimately, the safety of students, faculty, and staff is the guiding factor that informs this policy and will always remain the School’s top priority.

Communication During Inclement Weather Events

Campus closings and delayed starts due to inclement weather are administered on a university level. Students are encouraged to visit their campus website to determine if classes have been cancelled or if a delayed start has been enacted. Students are also encouraged to register for their campus-specific alert system to be notified via text or social media.

School based communications regarding inclement weather will typically be sent out via email. Students are responsible for checking their official UNC email consistently as well as course specific Sakai sites. This includes information regarding video conferencing and classroom recordings; class specific information from course directors; university announcements, and school based announcements.

Any student who deems it unsafe to travel during inclement weather, even when the campus has re-opened and is operating on a normal schedule, should communicate directly with the course director for the given class via email and copy the assistant director of the office of curricular and student affairs (Colleen Wernoski). Asheville based students should also copy the regional director of operations (Laura Bratsch).

Classroom Live Streaming and Recording Capabilities

During weather-related instances outlined in this policy, the School will make a best effort to provide video conferencing and/or record affected classes. The School’s ability to provide video conferencing or record classes is dependent on the room/location of the course.  Video conferencing is administered through Zoom. Only the following classrooms are equipped with the video conferencing capabilities

  • Asheville Campus: Karpen 106, 011, Zeis 018A, Zeis 325A
  • Chapel Hill Campus: Beard 102, 105, 106, 116, 200; Kerr 1001, 1304, 2304 2001; Marsico 4004

The following rooms are equipped with recording capabilities:

  • Asheville Campus: Karpen 106, 011
  • Chapel Hill Campus: Beard 102, 116, 200

Campus Closing Due to Inclement Weather

In the event of inclement weather that closes either the Asheville or Chapel Hill campus, classes on that campus are cancelled for the specified period of time. Campus closings are administered on a university level and take into account travel safety and the ability to navigate around and throughout the campus. In the event of a campus closing, students will not be allowed to attend class or enter buildings. Students will not be penalized for missing class due to the closing if the given course originates from the alternate campus that is open on that day. Course directors will communicate directly with enrolled students to outline the method and timing by which assignments, activities, quizzes, or tests are to be made up. Students are expected to resume the normal class schedule once the campus is re-opened.

If the campus from which a course originates is open while the other campus is closed, the School will follow the steps below in order to provide access to missed classroom lectures and activities:

  1. The School will make a best effort to provide video conferencing for courses via Zoom and notify students of access via Sakai or email. The School’s ability to provide video conferencing is dependent on the room/location of the course. Please reference the “Classroom Video Conferencing and Recording Capabilities” section of this policy for a list of classrooms.
  2. The School will make a best effort to provide recorded lectures via classroom capture for affected courses and will notify the students of access via Sakai or email. Distribution of the recorded lectures could take up to 24 hours after the class ends due to processing. The School’s ability to capture/record classes is dependent on the room/location of the course. Please reference the “Classroom Video Conferencing and Recording Capabilities” section of this policy for a list of classrooms.

Campus Delayed or Flex Start Due to Inclement Weather

If inclement weather produces a delayed start on either the Asheville or Chapel Hill Campus, the following policy will apply.

During a delayed start, classes originating from the delayed start campus are cancelled during the specified time period. It is at the discretion of the course director to determine and communicate whether or not class will be held on a given date if the delayed start cancels a portion of the regularly scheduled class. Decisions of this nature should be made no later than 2 hours in advance of the start of class in order to arrange for the needed technology and support. In this instance, the course director should communicate a decision to hold class to the following parties:

  1. All enrolled students (Sakai)
  2. Tier 1 inclement weather team at pharmacyweather@listserv.unc.edu. Members of this team include:
    1. Director, Office of Curricular and Student Affairs
    2. Assistant Directors, Office of Curricular and Student Affairs
    3. Director of Educational Technology
    4. Director of Facilities
    5. Asheville-based Regional Director of Operations
    6. Asheville-based Videoconferencing Analyst

If the location from which a course originates is operating on a normal schedule, yet the alternate campus is on a delayed start, students on the delayed start campus should not plan to travel to campus for class during the specified time of the delay nor should they be on campus. Delayed starts are made at the university level and based on safety. Course directors will communicate directly with enrolled students to outline the method and timing by which assignments, activities, quizzes, or tests are to be made up. Students are expected to resume the normal class schedule once the delayed start expires.

If the location from which a course originates is operating on a normal schedule while the other campus is on a delayed start, the School will follow the steps below in order to provide access to missed classroom lectures and activities:

  1. The School will make a best effort to provide video conference capabilities for courses via Zoom and notify students of access to the Zoom connection information via Sakai or email. The School’s ability to provide video conferencing is dependent on the room/location of the course. Please reference the “Classroom Video Conferencing and Recording Capabilities” section of this policy for a list of classrooms.
  2. The School will make a best effort to provide recorded lectures via classroom capture for affected courses and notify students of access via Sakai or email. Distribution of the recorded lectures could take up to 24 hours after the class ends. The School’s ability to capture/record classes is dependent on the room/location of the course. Please reference the “Classroom Video Conferencing and Recording Capabilities” section of this policy for a list of classrooms.

Class Specific Inclement Weather Decisions

As always, it is within the purview of course directors to cancel class given extenuating circumstances even if the campus is operating on a normal schedule. This also includes inclement weather that may preclude the faculty member from safely travelling to a given campus. Students should carefully monitor direct communications from course directors regarding class cancellations that fall outside the provisions of the inclement weather policy. Class cancellation decisions should be made no later than 2 hours before the start of a given class. If a specific class is cancelled, the course director should also email the Tier 1 inclement weather team at pharmacyweather@listserv.unc.edu.

Inclement Weather While University Courses Are Not in Session

It is not uncommon, for doctor of pharmacy courses to start earlier than traditional undergraduate and graduate courses at UNC. In the event that inclement weather occurs during this time, School administrators may make closing or delayed start decisions independently of the university. Students are required to monitor possible closings or delayed starts via university email. These decisions will be made no later than 2 hours before the start of a given class.

Graduate Students

For graduate courses, students will follow the inclement weather closing and delayed start decisions as outlined by The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The School understands that laboratory activities often require time-sensitive work, effort, and intervention. Graduate student laboratory activities during a university closing or delayed start will mirror the SPA provisions (condition levels I, II, or III) as outlined in university policy: https://hr.unc.edu/benefits/leave-holidays/weather-emergency/. Graduate students are urged to always consider personal safety and well-being first but are also encouraged to closely communicate attendance with faculty and/or their PI during inclement weather situations impacting laboratory activities.

 

As a student assigned to a clinical agency via contractual agreement or Memorandum of Understanding between the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the agency, you are allowed access to the records of clients or research subjects. Information specific to clients or subjects from any source and in any form, including paper records, oral communication, audio recording, electronic display, and research data files is strictly confidential. Access to confidential clients/subjects information is permitted only in a need-to-know basis.

It is the policy of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy that students of the School shall respect and preserve privacy and confidentiality of clients/subjects information, regardless of the agency to which the student or faculty is assigned. Violations of this policy include, but are not limited to

  • accessing information that is not within the scope of your assignment;
  • misusing, disclosing without proper authorization, or altering patient, subject or personnel information;
  • disclosing to another person your sign-on code and password for accessing electronic or computerized records;
  • using another person’s sign-on code and password for accessing electronic or computerized records;
  • leaving a secured application unattended while signed on;
  • attempting to access a secured application without proper authorization; and
  • failing to properly secure data files.

Violation of this policy by students of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy has a Contractual Agreement or Memorandum of Understanding, may constitute ground for corrective action up to and including loss of agency privileges, dismissal or termination from the School in accordance with applicable agency, School or University procedures. Violation of this policy by any member of the School’s student body may constitute grounds for termination of the contractual relationship or other terms of affiliation between the School and the agency. Unauthorized release of confidential information may also result in personal, civil, and/or criminal liability and legal penalties.

I have read and agree with the terms of the above statement and will read and comply with agency and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy policies and standards relative to information security. A copy of the School’s Information Security Policy is in the Student Handbook

Policy

Information, as here in after defined, in all its forms and throughout its life cycle will be protected in a manner consistent with its sensitivity and value to any agency to which a student or faculty member is assigned via contractual agreement or Memorandum of Understanding between the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the agency. This protection includes an appropriate level of security over the equipment and software used to process, store, and transmit information.

This policy applies to all information which includes clinical information generated in the context of patient care or clinical research, including, for example, laboratory data, x-ray results, other tests and procedures, and dictated and written notes detailing patient histories and physical exam findings. Such client/subject-related data may be available electronically, or in written form in standard medical records and patient charts. It may be available for individual or groups of clients/subjects. Such information may reside in large central computer databases, such as those maintained by large hospitals and academic health centers where it can be made available electronically to peripheral workstations, such as clinical workstations or peripheral clinical databases maintained by individual agency personnel. It may also reside in databases that are separate from the centrally maintained databases, such as the clinical or research databases that have been developed by certain agency personnel members.

Scope

The scope of information security is protection of information that is written, spoken, recorded electronically or printed, from accidental or intentional modification, destruction or disclosure. Information will be protected throughout its life cycle (origination, entry, processing, distribution, storage, and disposal).

Examples of Breaches of Security

Accessing information that is not within the scope of your job/role as student or faculty member.

•  Unauthorized reading of account information

•  Unauthorized reading of a client’s/subject’s chart

•  Unauthorized access of personnel file information

• Accessing information that you do not “need-to-know” for the proper execution of your job function

Misusing, disclosing without proper authorization, or altering patient or personnel information:

•  Making unauthorized marks on a client’s or subject’s chart

•  Making unauthorized changes to a personnel file or research data files

•  Sharing or reproducing information in a client’s/subject’s chart or personnel file with unauthorized personnel

•  Discussing confidential information in a public area such as a waiting room or elevator

Disclosing to another person your sign-on code and password for accessing electronic or computerized records:

•  Telling a coworker your password so that he or she can log in to your work

•  Telling an unauthorized person the access codes for personnel files or patient accounts

Using another person’s sign-on code and password for accessing electronic or computerized records:

•  Using a co-worker’s password to log into the hospital’s computer system

•  Unauthorized use of a login code for access to personnel files or client/subject information

Leaving a secured application unattended while signed on

•  Being away from your desk while you are logged in an application

•  Allowing a coworker to use your secured application for which he or she does not have access after you have logged in

Attempting to access a secured application without proper authorization:

•  Trying passwords and login codes to gain access to an unauthorized area of the computer system

•  Using a coworker’s application for which you do not have access after he or she is logged in

Under the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), you have the right to inspect and review your education records at the University and the right to request amendment of those records if they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of your privacy rights. You also have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education alleging that the University has not complied with FERPA.

To inspect your education records, file a written request with the individual who has custody of the records you wish to inspect (University registrar, academic dean, department chair, director of housing and residential education, etc.). To request amendment, discuss your request informally with the records custodian. If she or he does not agree to amend them, she or he will notify you of your appeal rights.

In accordance with FERPA, the University, in most cases, will not release personally identifiable information from your education records without your prior written consent. There are exceptions to this rule. For example:

(1)   The University will release information without your prior consent to teachers, officials and employees of UNC-Chapel Hill who have a legitimate educational interest in the information. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if it is in the educational interest of the student in question for the official to have the information, or if it is necessary or desirable for the official to obtain the information in order to carry out his or her official duties or to implement the policies of the University of North Carolina.

(2)   If you are enrolled simultaneously at UNC-Chapel Hill and another school or school system, or if you seek or intend to enroll in another school or school system, the University will forward your education records to officials of the other school or school system, upon request, without notice to you.

(3)  If the University takes disciplinary action against you for conduct that posed a significant risk to your safety or well-being or that of other students or members of the University community, the University may disclose information about that disciplinary action to officials of other schools that have a legitimate educational interest in your behavior. That disclosure will also be made without notice to you.

A number of other exceptions to the rule are set out in the University’s FERPA policy. You may obtain a copy of the policy and additional information about FERPA from the associate university counsel, CB #9150, 110 Bynum Hall. The FERPA policy and federal FERPA regulations can be viewed online here. The Office of the University Registrar will release directory information without your prior written consent unless you have notified that office to restrict the release of directory information.

Directory information is defined as a student’s:

Name; address (local and grade-billing addresses); Person Information Number (PID); telephone listing (local and grade-billing numbers); date and place of birth; county, state, and/or U.S. territory from which the student originally enrolled (if a student enrolled from a foreign country, this is not directory information); major field of study; class (junior, senior, etc.); enrollment status (full-time, half-time, part-time); participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height of members of athletic teams; dates of attendance; degrees and awards received; the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended; anticipated graduation date; and campus electronic mail address.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills (CPR) are considered a core competency for all health professionals. All students enrolled in health professions programs at UNC-Chapel Hill are expected to demonstrate competency in adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation/basic life support (CPR/BLS). For the PharmD program, students must obtain AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION BASIC LIFE SUPPORT (BLS) FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CPR certification and provide evidence of certification by March of the PY1 year. This certification must be maintained throughout enrollment in the PharmD program. In essence, a student must be CPR certified during all clerkship experiences. CPR certification is typically renewed every two years. Students who fail to meet and maintain this requirement may not be allowed to participate in clerkships.

Please note: Unfortunately, the Red Cross CPR courses do not meet the standard for CPR compliance. We will be unable to confirm the requirement if a Red Cross certification is submitted.

A copy of the certification card (front and back) showing the course sponsor, date(s) of participation, and student signature should be uploaded to the appropriate section of RxPreceptor. Evidence of renewal must be also uploaded when applicable. Information will be forthcoming in the Professional Development class or students may reference the support document listed below.

Various mechanisms exist for a student to accomplish this curricular requirement:

  • Student organizations in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy (such as TABS) may sponsor CPR certification classes.  Further details and class schedules are sent out on a semester-by-semester basis.
  • Independently enroll in an AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION BASIC LIFE SUPPORT (BLS) FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CPR certification course through local community organizations, hospitals, community colleges, American Heart Association affiliates, or other vendors. Most courses range from three to seven hours in length and typically cost $40 to $90 per session (there may be additional costs for books or other supplies).  A list of providers for both the UNC and Asheville campuses is available under the Student Compliance Information folder in the Document Library of RxPreceptor (“CPR Courses” PDF).
  • Students should contact the Office of Experiential Education if they have any questions or concerns about this requirement.

Rights and Procedure of Recourse for Students Involved in Research

The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy strives for excellence in education and research in the pharmaceutical sciences. In order to achieve excellence, the faculty of the School believes it is essential that students have the opportunity to participate in research that is important, challenging, feasible, ethical and complementary to the students’ needs. In many (in fact, most) cases the student research experience will include individuals or organizations external to the University of North Carolina. This policy statement is intended to assist students and faculty in assuring that research projects involving students are consistent with the goal of achieving excellence in graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences.

Both philosophy and pragmatism lead to the conclusion that research in pharmaceutical science and pharmacy practice unavoidably involves individuals and organizations external to the University. The pharmaceutical sciences have, by definition, an applied orientation, and the large numbers of pharmaceutical research and development organizations in the Research Triangle Park area translate into a unique opportunity for collaboration among pharmaceutical scientists. Pharmacy practice and practitioners represent an extended network of research opportunities for students and faculty. Moreover, scientific inquiry is international in scope and cannot be defined in terms of state, regional, or national boundaries. In the normal pursuit of intellectual inquiry it is expected and encouraged that expertise from commercial, academic, government and other organizations will coalesce into multidisciplinary and collaborative projects. It is further expected that many of these projects will involve financial, in-kind, or other support from non-university sources. Neither the involvement of non-University collaborators nor the presence of extramural research support can, by itself, be construed as a conflict of interest or commitment. The opposite, in fact, is true; multidisciplinary and extramurally supported research practices are essential ingredients to excellence in the pharmaceutical sciences.

Nevertheless, recognizing that it is possible for external funding sources and personal relationships among scientists to function in a manner detrimental to the academic interests or progress of students, this statement of policy and procedure is provided to all students in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

First, all research conducted by faculty, students, and staff of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy must comply with all pertinent institutional policies. Some examples include protection of research subjects, safe laboratory procedures, animal care policies, grant and contract requirements for disclosure of research findings, and infectious disease control procedures. Do not hesitate to seek guidance on ethical and regulatory issues. Questions concerning any matter relating to institutional policies or procedures may be directed to the graduate student’s faculty adviser, the division chair, the associate dean for graduate education and scholarship, the Office of Research, the University’s Research Compliance Coordinator, or the Office of University Counsel.

Second, each student research experience will involve a unique set of circumstances, including source(s) of extramural support, involvement of external collaborators, relationships between collaborators, relationships between students and faculty, and supervision of people and resources. In accord with the University’s Policy on Conflicts of Interest and Commitment, students and trainees working on research studies under the supervision of a faculty member with a relevant conflict of interest that has been approved by the University in conjunction with a plan for management of the conflict, must be informed as required by the management plan, in writing: a) that the approved conflict of interest activity exists, and b) that student or trainee concerns, if any, can be discussed with the chair of the University Committee on Conflicts of Interest and Commitment, with the University’s research compliance coordinator, department chair, dean, or, the Conflict of Interest Monitor or Monitoring Committee if one has been established for the research project.

One of the most valuable aspects of a student’s experience is gaining an understanding of the dynamics of managing a multidisciplinary research experience. Generally, the student should rely upon the advice and direction of his or her faculty research adviser in gaining the greatest benefit from this experience. However, if it appears to the student that either (1) his or her interests are being compromised by inappropriate actions as part of the research experience, or (2) his or her interests as a graduate student are in conflict with the interests of persons who have a significant role in the research experience (i.e., faculty adviser, financial sponsor, co-investigator, collaborator, or other), the student should immediately seek assistance in addressing these concerns by contacting anyone on the following list with whom the student would feel most comfortable discussing the matter: the chair of the University Committee on Conflicts of Interest and Commitment, the University’s research compliance coordinator, or a member of the Conflicts of Interest Monitoring Committee if one has been established for the applicable research project, the research adviser, the division chair, the associate dean for graduate education and scholarship, or the dean. If the student is not satisfied with assistance provided by these contacts, the student may consult the Provost’s Office for guidance. It is University policy that there may not be retaliation against a student for good faith disclosure of her or his academic concerns.

Third, in order to prevent conflicts of interest that act to the detriment of students and faculty, students are encouraged to participate in frequent, candid and thoughtful discussions about technical as well as ethical implications of their research. At a minimum, faculty should inform students about (1) the source of all extramural funding directly supporting the graduate student’s research experience, (2) all collaborators and co-investigators who may be directly involved in the research experience, (3) any personal and/or professional relationships between the faculty research advisor and anyone who may be directly involved in supporting the research, and (4) any restrictions—implied or explicit—on the student’s learning experience that may be related to items 1 to 3 above. Faculty should encourage students to feel free to discuss academic and research concerns with them and also with their division chair or with the associate dean for graduate education and scholarship without fear of retaliation.

Policy on HIV-Infected and HBV-Infected Employees and Students Who are Engaged in University Patient-Care Activities

  1. Introduction and Purpose
  2. Employee and Student Rights
  3. Employee and Student Responsibilities
  4. Reporting Requirements
  5. Obligations of Confidentiality and Limitations on Disclosure
  6. Notification to Patients
  7. Exposure-Prone Procedures
  8. Universal Precautions in Treatment
  9. Expert Panel Membership
  10. Expert Panel Responsibilities
  11. Department Chair, Dean, and Division Chief Responsibilities
  12. Alternative Patient-Care and Career Opportunities
  13. Applications for Enrollment
  14. Effective Date

1. Introduction and Purpose

The medical, scientific, and legal understanding of AIDS, HIV infection, and HBV infection is still evolving. In order to respond to the challenges of both HIV and HBV infection with safety, sensitivity, and flexibility, based on the best currently available medical, scientific, and legal information, it is the policy of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to review, evaluate, and respond on an individual case-by-case basis to any instances of HIV and HBV infection among University employees or students engaged in patient-care activities, according to the guidelines provided herein.

This Policy supplements the Policy on AIDS issued by the chancellor in February 1986. This supplemental Policy is intended specifically to address issues relating to employment and enrollment of employees and students of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill engaged in patient-care activities. When University employees or students are engaged in patient-care activities at facilities other than those of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (for example, at The University of North Carolina Health Care System), the policies of those institutions must also be observed insofar as they are applicable.

2. Employee and Student Rights

University employees and students who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus, or who have AIDS, or who are infected with Hepatitis B virus will not be excluded from participating in University patient-care activities, or restricted in their access to University patient-care services or facilities, because of their health status, unless medically-based judgments in individual cases establish that exclusion or restriction is appropriate for the welfare of patients, the welfare of other members of the patient-care community, or the welfare of the infected individual.

3. Employee and Student Responsibilities

University employees and students engaged in patient-care activities are encouraged to know their HIV and HBV status. Any student or employee engaged in patient-care activities who knows, or has reasonable basis for believing, that she or he is infected with HIV or HBV is expected to seek expert advice about his or her health circumstances and is obligated, ethically and legally, to conduct himself or herself responsibly, in accordance with such knowledge, for the protection of patients and other members of the community.

  1. Any employee who knows, or has reasonable basis for believing, that he or she is infected with HIV-1 or HBV, and who may perform, in connection with his or her employment, patient-care procedures that may have the characteristics of exposure-prone procedures, is required to share that information, on a confidential basis as provided within this Policy in Section 4, so that the University can act to protect the welfare of patients and other members of the University community and can respond appropriately to the employee’s health and employment needs. An employee who does not share that information as provided in this Policy may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.
  2. Any student who knows, or has reasonable basis for believing, that he or she is infected with HIV-1 or HBV, and whose curriculum may require that he or she perform patient-care procedures that may have the characteristics of exposure-prone procedures, is required to share that information, on a confidential basis as provided within this Policy in Section 4, so that the University can act to protect the welfare of patients and other members of the University community and can respond appropriately to the student’s health and educational needs.

4. Reporting Requirements

Upon learning or forming a reasonable belief that he or she is infected with HIV or HBV, or at a high risk of developing an HIV or HBV infection, an employee or student who performs, or may have occasion to perform, procedures that have the characteristics of exposure-prone procedures described herein must desist immediately from performing such procedures and must comply with (a) – (c), below:

(a) Advise one of the following persons of his/her health status:

(1) The chair of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS;

(2) His or her dean;

(3) His or her department chair;

(4) His or her division chief;

(5) The director of the counseling service in the Office of Human Resources; and/or

(6) The director of the Student Health Service.

The person to whom a report is made pursuant to this Section must promptly report to the dean of the School where the employee or student is employed or enrolled, respectively, and the dean will notify the chair of the Task Force on AIDS who then will convene the expert panel of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS referred to herein.

(b) Seek, or permit one of the individuals named in Section 4(a), above, to seek, guidance from the expert panel of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS, and

(c) Abide by the decision of the dean of the School and the chancellor, if applicable, regarding whether the individual may continue to perform those procedures and whether any other modification or restriction of this individual’s employment and/or academic activities is necessary, as provided in Sections 9 and 10.

5. Obligations of Confidentiality and Limitations on Disclosure

The University recognizes the importance of protecting, to the greatest extent possible and within the bounds provided by law, the confidentiality and privacy of any employee or student found to have HIV or HBV infection. Accordingly, such information will be handled by University employees who come into possession of this information with the same degree of care and sensitivity accorded to other types of highly confidential medical information. However, because the University also has the responsibility to protect patients, employees, and students from the harmful acts or conditions of its employees and students, there cannot be a guarantee of complete confidentiality that may interfere with this responsibility. Accordingly, it is a condition of employment and enrollment that employees and students subject to this Policy agree to the disclosure of information regarding their HIV or HBV infection as provided hereafter and for the purposes set forth herein.

Information concerning the health status of an employee or student with HIV or HBV infection must not be disclosed by University employees who come into possession of this information unless:

1)       The infected individual consents in writing to such disclosure; or

2)

a) This disclosure is necessary for an individual identified in Section 4 of this Policy to initiate the review process described in Section 4, and

b) The disclosing party knows or has reason to believe that the infected individual has declined or has failed to follow the provisions of Section 4 within a reasonable period of time regarding personal notification of one of the individuals listed in Section 4; or

3) This disclosure is necessary to implement a University decision to monitor, modify, restrict, or discontinue the clinical activities of an HIV-infected or HBV-infected employee or student; or

4)

a) This disclosure is necessary to determine whether or not a potentially hazardous breach of technique has occurred in a laboratory or clinic, and

b) The infected individual declines or fails to respond within a reasonable time period to a recommendation that he/she personally notify the person in charge of the laboratory or clinic; or

5) This disclosure is required to protect the public health.

The number of persons within or outside of the University to be advised of the existence and, if necessary, the identity of an employee or student with HIV or HBV infection will be kept to an absolute minimum. Information should be shared only to the degree necessary to permit the expert panel of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS and the University administration (as hereinafter provided) to respond as provided by this Policy. Determining who does or does not have a legitimate and significant need to know about a particular case of HIV or HBV infection is a difficult question that, in case of doubt, is ultimately resolved by the chancellor or his delegate, the chair of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS. That task force is available to assist any member of the University community needing guidance on such matters.

6. Notification to Patients

The public health benefit of notification of patients who have had exposure-prone procedures performed by employees or students found thereafter to be infected with HIV or positive for HBeAg shall be considered on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration an assessment of specific risks, confidentiality issues, and legal responsibilities. Carefully designed and implemented follow-up studies may be necessary to determine more precisely the risk of transmission that may have existed during such procedures. Decisions regarding notification and follow-up studies will be made by the University administration in consultation with state and local public health officials and the expert panel of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS.

7. Exposure-Prone Procedures

All employees and students who perform procedures that have the characteristics of exposure-prone procedures described herein in this Section should know their HIV and HBV status. Employees or students who perform procedures that have the characteristics of exposure-prone procedures described herein and who do not have serologic evidence of immunity to Hepatitis B from vaccination or from previous infection should know their HBsAg status, and if that is positive, they should also know their HBeAg status.

Designation and definition of exposure-prone procedures will be provided in connection with consideration of individual employees and students pursuant to this Policy by the appropriate medical/surgical/dental services on a case-by-case basis. Characteristics of exposure-prone procedures may include, but need not be limited to, digital palpation of a needle tip in a body cavity or the simultaneous presence of the employee’s or student’s fingers and a needle or other sharp instrument or object in a highly confined anatomic site or a site where visibility is poor. Performance of exposure-prone procedures may present a recognized risk of percutaneous injury to the employee or student, and—if such an injury occurs—the employee’s or student’s blood is likely to contact the patient’s body cavity, subcutaneous tissues, and/or mucous membranes. However, the presence of any of the characteristics listed does not necessarily require the characterization of a particular procedure as exposure-prone. Such characterization shall be on a case-by-case basis as provided in Section 10.

8. Universal Precautions in Treatment

All employees and students engaged in patient-care activities must adhere at all times to relevant Universal Precautions, as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control, including the appropriate use of hand washing, protective barriers, and care in the use and disposal of needles and other sharp instruments. All employees and students who have exudative lesions or weeping dermatitis must refrain from all direct patient care and from handling patient-care equipment and devices used in performing invasive procedures until the condition resolves. Such individuals must be reassigned to other appropriate activities until such time as such condition resolves. All employees and students must also comply at all times with current guidelines for disinfection and sterilization of reusable devices used in invasive procedures. Employees may seek additional advice from the University’s Environment, Health and Safety Office. Students may seek additional advice from the Office of Student Services in their respective schools.

Deans, department chairs, directors, and division chiefs are charged with the responsibility for seeing that the guidelines and policies referred to in this Section are widely disseminated and enforced. Each employee and student, however, must assume responsibility for the protection of patients and his or her own protection by properly following recommended infection control practices.

9. Expert Panel Membership

The expert panel of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS shall be comprised of, but need not be limited to, the following: the employee’s or student’s personal physician(s); a representative of the Student Health Service (in the case of a student whose personal physician is other than an employee of the Student Health Service); an infectious disease specialist with expertise in the epidemiology of HIV and HBV transmission; a specialist in infection control; an ethicist; the dean of the School or his or her delegate; and a representative of The University of North Carolina Health Care System. The University vice chancellor and general counsel will advise the panel. If the individual’s personal physician is unavailable, then the chair of the task force will appoint a physician from the Department of Medicine (in the case of an employee) or from the Student Health Service (in the case of a student) .

At the request of the dean of the school where the employee or student is employed or enrolled, and with the approval of the vice chancellor for medical affairs, the chair of the Chancellor’s Task Force on AIDS shall modify the composition of the expert panel for employees or students whose patient-care activities are performed wholly or in part at The University of North Carolina Health Care System to achieve a review panel comparable to or identical to, as the dean may request, any similar panel of The University of North Carolina Health Care System.

10. Expert Panel Responsibilities

The purposes of the expert panel are to:

(a) maximize the protection of patients from exposure to HIV or HBV by the infected employee or student;

(b) maximize the protection of the infected employee or student from infectious exposure; and

(c) maximize confidentiality with respect to all matters related to the infected employee or student.

These purposes must guide all recommendations and counsel of the expert panel to the dean. The expert panel, therefore, should base its recommendations on a judicious, objective, neutral, and individualized analysis of, among other things, the student’s or employee’s health status, technical expertise, his or her ability and willingness to adhere to Universal Precautions, respective risks posed by his/her HIV and/or HBV infection, and the employee’s or student’s career objectives. The analysis may entail interviewing the infected employee or student . The recommendations of the expert panel should include a detailed description of those circumstances, if any, under which it recommends that the infected employee or student be permitted to perform exposure-prone procedures as defined for the particular circumstances in question.

The expert panel, upon completing its analysis, will submit its recommendations in writing to the dean with a copy to the infected individual.

The panel recommendations are advisory and, thus, not binding on the dean. The dean, acting in accordance with all applicable University procedures and in consultation with the appropriate vice chancellor, is responsible for determining to what extent, if at all, the panel recommendations are to be accepted and implemented; provided, however, that the dean’s decision shall specify the circumstances under which, if any, the employee or student may perform or may resume performing exposure-prone procedures. Such circumstances could include notifying prospective patients of the employee’s or student’s seropositivity before the patients undergo such procedures. The dean’s decision may also provide that the employee or student must maintain a “log” which describes with particularity the actual circumstances (i.e., patient name, date, protocol) of any procedures performed.

The dean, within ten working days of receipt of the panel recommendations, shall notify the infected employee or student of his or her determination in writing, which should include a copy of the panel recommendations.

The expert panel should meet on a regular or as-needed basis to reassess and, where appropriate, to modify its original recommendations as circumstances warrant. In the case of a student, these meetings may take place as curriculum or courses vary within a particular year, if necessary.

The University shall modify, restrict, or discontinue the employment and/or academic activities of an HIV-infected employee or student only in accordance with applicable University procedures, and only if the University through the procedures herein has determined that no reasonable accommodation exists that would enable the infected individual to perform his or her employment and/or academic activities without posing an unacceptable risk to patients or to himself or herself or others.

The University shall implement a decision to modify, restrict, or discontinue the employment and/or academic activities of an HIV-infected or HBV-infected individual as discreetly and confidentially as possible, with as little impact as possible to the person, his or her career, and his or her standing in the community.

11. Department Chair, Director, and Division Chief Responsibilities

Department chairs, directors, and division chiefs are expected to counsel HIV-infected and HBV-infected employees and students who perform invasive procedures that are not defined on a case-by-case basis as exposure-prone regarding proper infection control procedures (e.g., Universal Precautions and current recommendations on disinfection/sterilization). These individuals also are charged with the responsibility for seeing that proper infection control procedures are followed by employees and students. Employees or students infected with HIV or HBV who perform invasive procedures not identified on a case-by-case basis as exposure-prone will be able to perform such routine invasive procedures, provided the infected individual complies with established infection control guidelines (e.g., Universal Precautions and the like).

12. Alternative Patient-Care and Career Opportunities

Employees or students whose practices are modified because of their HIV or HBV infection status should, whenever possible, be provided opportunities to continue appropriate patient-care activities. Career counseling and job retraining are encouraged, to the extent resources permit, to promote the continued use of the individual’s talents, knowledge, and skills. Employees and students whose practices are modified because of HBV infection should be reevaluated periodically to determine whether their HBeAg status changes are due to resolution of infection or as a result of treatment.

13. Applications for Enrollment

HIV-infected or HBV-infected applicants for enrollment in the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, and certain other fields involved in patient care may wish to evaluate their career goals. First, they may wish to consider the implications of electing a prolonged period of medical, dental, nursing, or other education, with the significant possibility that they will become disabled during training or early in their career. Second, they may wish to consider various career choices because of the hazards of their exposure to infection in certain portions of medical, dental, nursing or other patient-care fields of education and practice. Third, they may wish to evaluate career choices after recognizing that barriers to certain exposure-prone procedures and fields of specialization within medicine, dentistry, nursing, or other patient-care fields may be imposed because of possible risks of infection to patients. Fourth, they may wish to consider the financial costs of such education in light of the personal health and career uncertainties that confront them. Students may seek additional advice through the Office of Student Services of the School in question.

14. Effective Date

This Policy is effective April 18, 1991, revised July 1, 2002.

Introduction and Purpose

The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) recommends that schools of pharmacy obtain a criminal history check for students admitted to doctor of pharmacy programs. Criminal history checks are, in some circumstances, required by UNC System policy and are also standard for many health care facilities. The practice of performing a criminal history check helps protect the safety and well being of the University community and patients, and it allows schools to ensure that students are able to complete their studies. It is therefore the policy of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Doctor of Pharmacy Program (Program) to obtain a criminal history check for every applicant who is admitted to the program.

I. Applicability to Applicants and Students

A.      Program Applicants

  • Applicants to the Program will be notified of the criminal history check requirement as a part of the admissions process.
  • All offers of admission to the Program will be contingent upon the results of the criminal history check.
  • When applicants are offered admission to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and notify the School that they intend to enroll in the Program, they will receive an email from the Program’s third party screening organization. The email will be sent to the address that the applicant specified in his or her PharmCAS application. The message will contain a link to an online form that the applicant will use to provide basic identifying information and consent for the criminal history check to be completed.
  • When the criminal history check has been completed, the applicant will receive an email requesting that he or she review the report. The applicant will have ten calendar days to review the report and dispute its accuracy before it is made available to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. If the applicant does not review the report within the specified ten days, it will be distributed to the School after the ten calendar days has elapsed.
  • Fees for the individual background checks are included in the PharmCAS application. This fee is nonrefundable.
  • Students should consult with the PharmCAS Web site (www.pharmcas.org) for more details about the criminal history check procedures.

B.      Enrolled Program Students

  • All third-year students in the Program will be required to undergo a criminal history check during the spring semester. They must complete this check before they can begin their fourth-year pharmacy practice experiences. This criminal history check is initiated by the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs through our third party vendor.
  • Some pharmacy practice sites may also require additional or alternate background screening in order to meet a specific timeline and/or satisfy state or federal laws.  As a result of this, affected students (PY4/APPE as well as rising PY2 and PY3/IPPE) may be required to complete further checks as part of their rotation compliance.
  • Students that take a semester or longer leave of absence from the Program for any reason must submit to a new criminal history check before they can return to the Program.
  • Fees for the background checks must be remitted by the student directly to the agency performing the screening.  This fee is nonrefundable.
  • Students are required to provide practice experience sites with a copy of their criminal history check results upon request by the practice site.
  • If at any point during enrollment a student is charged with or convicted of any criminal act that may or not have been on a previous criminal background check, that student should contact the director of curricular & student affairs immediately to self disclose. Failure to self-disclose could lead to an honor court violation as well as referral to the Progressions Committee.

II. Procedures for Review by the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Students will be notified in writing by the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs if their background check reports any offenses beyond minor traffic violations.

  • Students will have ten calendar days after receipt of notification to submit an explanatory statement. If a statement is not received within this ten-day period, the process will continue without consideration of an explanatory statement.
  • The Doctor of Pharmacy Criminal History Check Committee (Committee), composed of faculty and staff from the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs and the Office of Experiential Education, will review these reports and statements.
  • The Criminal History Check Committee shall notify individuals of its decision, in writing, within thirty calendar days of the submission of the explanatory statement.

A.   Program Applicants

  • The Committee may rescind an offer of admission to the Program if an applicant’s criminal history check reveals that the applicant has committed a serious offense. Serious offenses include, but are not limited to, felonies, drug offenses, forgery, assault, abuse and neglect.
  • All determinations of eligibility or disqualification will be made in light of each individual case (i.e., no single type of offense will be used as an automatic rescission of acceptance or reason for dismissal).
  • The dean of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy shall have the sole authority to rule on any appeals by Program applicants regarding the decisions made by the Criminal History Check Committee. A decision of the Committee may be appealed in writing by the applicant, if done so within 5 business days of the receipt of the letter notifying them of the decision. The written appeal should be addressed and delivered to the dean of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

B.   Enrolled Program Students

  • If a third-year student’s criminal history check reveals serious offenses, the Committee may refer the student to the Honor Court System, when appropriate, or refer the student to the School’s Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee in cases where the University’s Honor Code is inapplicable.
  • Pharmacy practice experience sites have the discretion to deny a request for a student to be placed at that site based on the results of a criminal history check. This discretion is independent of any decision made by the Criminal History Check Committee. The student shall provide the background check and his or her explanatory statement to the facility upon request.

In 1990, the U.S. Congress enacted the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act, which requires postsecondary institutions to disclose campus crime statistics and security information. The act was renamed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security and Campus Crime Statistics Act in 1998 in memory of a student who was slain in her dorm room in 1986.

The Clery Act requires higher education institutions to give timely warnings of crimes that represent a threat to the safety of students or employees, and to make public their campus security policies. It also requires that crime data is collected, reported, and disseminated to the campus community and is also submitted to the U.S. Department of Education. The act is intended to provide students and their families, as higher education consumers, with accurate, complete, and timely information about safety on campus so they can make informed decisions.

The UNC Chapel Hill campus security report can be viewed here.

*Text taken from UNC Department of Public Safety website

Academic Course Load

The PharmD curriculum requires an average academic load of 17 semester (credit) hours during the first three professional years. In the PY4 year, the average academic load is 17 semester hours each semester (four 4-hour clerkships and one seminar series each semester). This makes for a total of approximately 138 semester hours of professional coursework required for graduation (total hours will vary slightly because of credit variance in professional electives and curriculum changes which may change the number of hours required).

In the unlikely event that you have been admitted to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy with deficiencies in your general education prerequisites, you must correct those deficiencies by taking extra courses. The most logical way to do this is by taking courses in summer school, although it may be possible in some cases to complete the pre-pharmacy deficiencies by means of correspondence or online courses during the summers. Students should try to satisfy these requirements before beginning their studies in the PharmD Program. All such deficiencies must be completed before the beginning of the PY4 year.

The minimum course load possible in any fall or spring semester is 12 semester hours of academic courses (excludes physical education activity courses) to maintain full-time student status in order to receive financial aid.

The maximum semester hour course load of academic courses you may take in fall or spring semester is 22.0 semester hours. You cannot take more than 18 semester hours in any one semester without permission of your adviser or the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs.

Research Courses/Independent Study Courses

PharmD students may work under the direct supervision of a faculty member in research/independent study courses. The objective of such courses is to stimulate or satisfy research or professional development interests among students. The project must be of a scholarly nature, involving the learning of research/scholarship methodologies or skills. Please see Independent Study and Research Electives located on the Elective Requirements page.

Variance from Required Curriculum

As a qualification for graduation from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy PharmD program, each student is required to satisfactorily complete the curriculum assigned to him or her at the time of entry into the program. In addition, in the rare case where a student has been accepted into the professional program with deficiencies in the pre-pharmacy program, those deficiencies must be rectified prior to the student commencing the final year of the professional program.

Ordinarily, the curricular program assigned to a student upon entry in the professional program will not be changed prior to graduation. However, the faculty of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy does reserve the right to alter a student’s required curriculum if such alteration is required by major modifications of the professional program.

On occasion, a student may believe that some particular event or aspect of his past academic achievements may warrant a modification of the requirements of his curriculum. That student may seek specific alteration to his required curriculum by addressing a request for such variance to the School’s Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee. Such request should include, in addition to the student’s full name and local contact information, a precise statement of the curricular variance requested and a full delineation of any facts, which the student believes would support this request. Where possible, documentation of those facts should be included. The committee will consider each such request, render a decision, and notify the student, and the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs as to that decision.

Students are hereby warned that request for variance submitted just prior to registration and preregistration periods will probably not be acted upon in sufficient time to affect that particular registration or preregistration. Foresight is highly recommended to anyone planning to submit a request for curriculum variance.

Class Attendance

Regular class attendance is a student obligation, and a student is responsible for all the work, including tests and written work, of all class meetings. No right or privilege exists which permits a student to be absent from any given number of class meetings.

If a student misses more classes than the instructor deems advisable, the instructor will report the facts to the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs for appropriate action. Instructors should include their attendance regulations in their course syllabi and discuss them during the first week of every class and report promptly to the Office of & Curricular & Student Affairs the name of any student who exceeds the number of absences deemed advisable. If the student misses without excuse more classes than the instructor deems advisable, the instructor may request that the dean drop the student from the course with a grade of F. Absences from class for valid reasons are excused only by the instructors.

Excused Absences for Religious Reasons

Students are authorized up to two excused absences each academic year for religious observances required by their faith. Students who wish to request more than two excused absences in an academic year for religious observances required by their faith will need to contact their course instructors and request the additional absence, which will only be granted with the course instructor’s permission. Primary holy days for religious observance are noted on a Web-based interfaith calendar site at www.interfaithcalendar.org.

Students are responsible for providing a written notice for an excused absence for a religious observance two weeks in advance of the date requested or as soon as possible if the date occurs within the first two weeks of the semester. This policy also applies to students who have an excused absence for a religious observance during the summer.

Students must be given the opportunity to make up tests and other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. Make-up tests may entail an alternative examination, or other accommodation which allows the student not to be penalized for an excused absence for a religious observance.

Registration

Registration is done over the Web using Connect Carolina. To access Web-based registration, go to myunc.edu, click on Connect Carolina and type in your Onyen and onyen password to proceed with registration. Each semester the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy will inform students of the dates and process of registration.

Adding and Dropping Courses

To add or drop courses, you use the Web-based registration site during the drop/add period. If you wish to add a restricted course, you must contact the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. For assistance, please e-mail pharmacystudentaffairs@unc.edu.

Complaints Related to Standards

According to the guidelines of our accreditation, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy has an obligation to respond to any written complaints by students lodged against the School that are related to the standards and the policies and procedures of the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE). These standards can be accessed athttp://www.acpe-accredit.org/pharmacists/standards.asp. If you have a complaint against these standards, please submit them in writing to the Executive Associate Dean at Chapel Hill, Pamela Joyner, EdD, MS Pharm.

Requirements for Graduation

You must complete with a passing grade (C or better) all courses required by the PharmD curriculum, and you must also have achieved a quality point average of 2.000 for all courses taken while you are enrolled as a student in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

If you have taken courses at UNC-Chapel Hill before your enrollment in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, you must also achieve a quality point average of 2.000 for all courses taken at UNC-Chapel Hill, including those in the PharmD curriculum.

To determine your quality point average for a semester’s work, multiply the number of semester hours assigned to each course by the number of quality points received, add the quality points received for all courses, and divide this total by the total number of semester hours attempted.

Withdrawal from the University

Students withdrawing from the University should complete an official withdrawal through the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy before the last day of classes during a semester. An official withdrawal constitutes an honorable dismissal from the University and may facilitate readmission. Failure to withdraw officially results in the assignment of IN or AB course grades which are computed as F grades in establishing grade point averages and academic eligibility. An official withdrawal involves the completion of an Application for Withdrawal form

.

  • Adopted May 21, 2003, for implementation fall term 2003 for PY1 students
  • Revised August 19, 2009
  • Revised December 12, 2011

Introduction: The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy faculty intends that every student admitted to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum achieves excellence in their professional knowledge, skill, and aptitude. The objectives, abilities, or outcomes defined for the curriculum and for each course within it provide the framework for assessment of student achievement.

Students enrolled in the PharmD curriculum receive a grade of A, B, C or F reflective of their achievement of the acquisition of knowledge and/or skills. The grade A denotes outstanding academic achievement and/or professional skill. The grade B indicates more than acceptable academic achievement and/or professional skill. The grade C indicates that the student has achieved acceptable and satisfactory knowledge and/or professional skills. The grade F indicates unacceptable achievement and/or performance and requires further study and/or practice by the student.

In view of its responsibility to the people of North Carolina and to the profession, the faculty reserves the right to dismiss a student from the PharmD program who does not in its judgment show sufficient promise to justify continuation, regardless of her/his academic record. If a student’s performance, including academic record, promise, or professional conduct is considered unsatisfactory, the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will make appropriate recommendations regarding the student’s continuation to the associate dean for professional education. The Committee will decide whether a student should be allowed to enter a review program (including appropriate reexamination), enter a decelerated curriculum, repeat a portion of an academic year or entire year, take a leave of absence with conditions upon return, or be dismissed. The recommendation for a dismissal or for a leave of absence will be transmitted to the associate dean for professional education for final dispensation.

Academic Guidelines for Progression in the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

  1. Students must demonstrate acceptable knowledge and/or skills in all courses and practice experiences in the doctor of pharmacy curriculum. Acceptable knowledge and/or skills are determined through evaluation of student performance that reflects objectives or competencies defined for each course within the context of competencies defined for the PharmD curriculum. Acceptable knowledge and/or skills in all courses administered by the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy are denoted by any of the grades A, B, or C (or H or P in practice experiences and approved courses).
  2. Students who do not demonstrate acceptable knowledge and/or skills will be given the grade F. A student who receives an F grade in a required course must remedy that grade, which must include the demonstration of acquisition of acceptable knowledge and/or skill for that course. The student may not enroll in subsequent courses for which the “failed” course serves as a prerequisite until the student has passed the prerequisite course. A student who again receives an F grade upon repeating a course, or who receives F grades in two or more required courses is subject to dismissal from the PharmD curriculum. The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will determine whether such a student will be allowed to continue in the PharmD curriculum, and, if allowed to continue, specify conditions for continuation.
  3. The temporary grades of IN (incomplete) and AB (absent from the final examination) can be used consistent with the guidelines within the Undergraduate Bulletin or the Graduate School Handbook.
  4. Students admitted to the PharmD curriculum must complete the curriculum within five academic years from entry into the Program (including any leaves of absenses), subject to review of individual circumstances by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee.

Policy on Final Grade Appeal

The student must first attempt to resolve any disagreement with the course coordinator. If the student fails to reach a satisfactory resolution, the student may appeal the grade in accordance with the following Policy on Final Grade Appeal:

  • The student must submit the appeal in writing along with a description of the results of the communication with the coordinator, any relevant test papers/term papers/graded materials to the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee. The information that the student presents to the Committee will be shared with the involved course coordinator who will be given an opportunity to respond to the student’s appeal. The student’s appeal should be made as soon as possible, but must be made within 5 business days after the official end of semester grades are reported for the course in question.

Appropriate Grounds for Final Grade Appeal

For an appeal of a final course grade to be considered, it must be based upon one or more of the following grounds and upon allegation that the ground or grounds cited influenced the grade assignment to the student’s detriment:

  • arithmetic or clerical error
  • arbitrariness, possibly including discrimination or harassment based upon the student’s race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression
  • personal malice
  • student conduct cognizable under the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance

Policy on Non-Academic Progression

The faculty of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy has a legal and ethical responsibility to protect members of the public and of the health care community from unsafe, unethical, or unprofessional pharmacy practices. The School is charged with preparation of competent pharmacists. Because competence must be assured not only in the knowledge and technical abilities of the student, but also in their standards of personal and professional conduct, student progress is carefully monitored to certify that students have acquired and can demonstrate appropriate knowledge, skills, behavioral characteristics, and ethical principles.

The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee reserves the right to dismiss or sanction a doctor of pharmacy candidate at the end of any semester, regardless of the student’s grades, if the student does not, in the judgment of the Committee, show sufficient promise to justify allowing the student to continue the study of pharmacy. Repeated failure to demonstrate professionalism, consistent with published codes of ethics for pharmacists (ex. APhA & NCAP) and the School’s Technical Standards, with respect to the management of patients or in interactions with other students, staff, faculty or preceptors constitutes grounds for dismissal. Any acts or patterns of behavior consistent with physical, emotional, or behavioral problems, that impair the student’s ability to interact effectively with others, prevent others from fully participating in the educational process, endanger the well-being of the student or others, threaten patient safety or confidentiality, discredit the profession, or in any other way that raises serious questions about the student’s fitness for professional practice will serve as a basis for review by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee. Any student who fails to participate in or does not respond to appropriate interventions (eg. treatment, counseling, community service, additional or repeated course or clerkship requirements) within a specified period of time is subject to dismissal from the Program. These non-academic factors serve as critical indicators of the student’s capacity to deliver a high standard of health care, meeting all technical, ethical, and legal requirements, and thus are considered by the faculty to be of equal importance with academic performance when making progression decisions.

If a faculty member or a student colleague believes there is evidence supporting a non-academic progression policy violation for a particular student, they should follow the guidelines listed below under Procedure for Dismissal (or Sanction) based on Non-Academic Performance. The Committee will decide if a dismissal or a sanction is an appropriate action.

Leaves of Absence

Students enrolled in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy who wish to take a leave of absence may return to the School within one year of the date of leave. All leaves must be approved by the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs. Students desiring to take a leave of absence should schedule a meeting with the director of curricular & student affairs to discuss the leave of absence and readmission process. Students who have been absent from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy for more than one year from last enrollment must reapply for admission to the School and must compete for readmission with the other applicants for the entering class in that year. In situations involving medical leave, it is possible to extend the one year leave on a case by case basis. If the student is readmitted to the School, the Scholastic Achievement and Progressions Committee will review completed coursework and make recommendations for completing the program. Students may be required to re-take some or all of previously completed coursework in the School of Pharmacy or complete competency testing.

Decisions Rendered by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee

Decisions rendered by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee may include, but are not limited to: adjustment of academic load; repetition of course or curriculum segments; participation in psychological counseling or other services offered on-campus (e.g., the writing center, tutoring, learning disabilities), academic probation, and dismissal.

The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee is not permitted to change the evaluation of student performance by the course coordinator unless there are grounds for appeal (see section on Final Grade Appeal).

Academic Probation: Students will be placed on academic probation for one year (subsequent fall and spring semesters) after they receive a grade of F in any required course. Students who are on academic probation shall not be allowed to:

  • Serve as officers or committee members in any School of Pharmacy organization
  • Participate in University extracurricular activities

Dismissal: Students may be dismissed from the School of Pharmacy for any of the following reasons:

  • Receive grades of F in two or more required courses
  • Persistent failure to demonstrate adherence to academic or non-academic responsibilities, including the Technical Standards for the School of Pharmacy
  • Attitudinal, behavioral, or criminal problems which interfere with the student’s responsibilities and progress through the curriculum

Dismissal from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Procedure for Dismissal based on Academic Performance:

  • Students who are in jeopardy of dismissal from the School of Pharmacy will be notified by the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee at least 5 business days prior to the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee meeting, at which a decision will be made.
  • Students so desiring may provide a written plea to the Committee noting their circumstances and any evidence that they feel is relevant and appropriate to bring forth. If the student does not respond to the Committee Chair within 5 business days, the Committee will make its decision in the absence of such information.
  • The Committee will make its decision known to the associate dean for professional education, who will notify the student in writing of the Committee’s decision.

Procedure for Dismissal (or Sanction) based on Non-Academic Performance:

  • When, in the judgment of a faculty member or a student colleague, a student’s behavior constitutes conduct of a nature that warrants dismissal (or sanction), the faculty member or student colleague shall so notify the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee in writing.
  • The Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will then notify the student and the faculty member or student colleague in writing within two weeks of the request as to the time and place for the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee hearing to determine whether, in the Committee’s judgment the dismissal (or sanction) is warranted. A minimum of 72 hours notification will be given for the hearing.
  • The Committee will hold a closed hearing at which the faculty member or student colleague may be present and provide oral or written evidence regarding the behavior that in the faculty member’s or student colleague’s judgment is grounds for dismissal (or sanction). The student may be present and given an opportunity to provide oral or written evidence regarding his/her behavior. The evidentiary proceedings will be recorded. Support persons, including legal counsel, cannot participate in the hearing process. Failure of the student to participate or be present, will not stop the proceedings of the Committee.
  • Following the evidentiary presentation, the Committee will convene in executive session to determine whether dismissal or other recommendations are warranted.
  • The Committee shall make its decision known in writing to the Associate Dean for Professional Education, the student, and the person initiating the charge.

Note: Some student conduct may be both an unsafe or unprofessional pharmacy practice and also an offense under the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance. In such a case, the matter will be referred first to the pharmacy student attorney general. If the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior does not constitute an offense under the Instrument, the School of Pharmacy will proceed under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression. If the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior constitutes an offense under the Instrument and that there is sufficient evidence to charge the student with an offense, the case will be heard by the Pharmacy Honor Court. If the Honor Court finds the student guilty of behavior that would also call the student’s professional fitness into question, the School of Pharmacy will consider the behavior under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression. However, if the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior would constitute an offense under the Instrument but that there is insufficient evidence to charge the student, the matter will not be considered under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression. Similarly, if the student is charged but the Honor Court finds the student not guilty, the matter will not be considered further under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression.

Policy for Appeal of Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee Decision

A decision of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee may be appealed in writing by the student, if done so within 5 business days of the receipt of the letter notifying them of the decision. The written appeal should be addressed and delivered to the dean of the School of Pharmacy. If the dean of the School upholds the decision of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee, a student may appeal the decision to the University Provost.

It is the student’s responsibility to maintain contact (including current address, phone, and email information in Student Central) with the chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee to ensure that the student promptly receives all relevant communications. If the student fails to maintain contact (including current address, phone, and email information in Student Central) with the chair, decisions made in the student’s absence will nonetheless be binding.

Policy on Prohibited Harassment and Discrimination

The University’s Policy on Prohibited Harassment and Discrimination prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of an individual’s race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Appendix B of this Policy provides specific information for students who believe that they have been discriminated against or harassed on the basis of one or more of these protected classifications.

Students who want additional information regarding the University’s process for investigating allegations of discrimination or harassment should contact the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office for assistance:

Equal Opportunity/ADA Office
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
100 E. Franklin Street, Unit 110
Campus Box 9160
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
Telephone: (919) 966-3576
Fax: (919) 962-2562
Email: equalopportunity@unc.edu

Any administrator or supervisor, including a department chair, associate dean or other administrator, who receives a student’s complaint about prohibited harassment or discrimination must notify the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office within five (5) calendar days of receiving the complaint. If a student raises a claim of prohibited harassment or discrimination during an academic appeal, an investigation of the student’s claim must be performed under the direction of the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office. The school or department must await the results of the harassment or discrimination investigation before deciding the student’s academic appeal.

Adopted May 21, 2003 for Implementation Fall Term 2003 for PY1 students; Revised  August 19, 2009; Revised December 12, 2011; Revised October  2012.

Introduction: The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy faculty intends that every student admitted to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum achieves excellence in their professional knowledge, skill, and aptitude.  The objectives, abilities, or outcomes defined for the curriculum and for each course within it provide the framework for assessment of student achievement.

Students enrolled in the PharmD curriculum receive a grade of A, B, C or F reflective of their achievement of the acquisition of knowledge and/or skills.  The grade A denotes outstanding academic achievement and/or professional skill.  The grade B indicates more than acceptable academic achievement and/or professional skill.  The grade C indicates that the student has achieved acceptable and satisfactory knowledge and/or professional skills.  The grade F indicates unacceptable achievement and/or performance and requires further study and/or practice by the student.

In view of its responsibility to the people of North Carolina and to the profession, the faculty reserves the right to dismiss a student from the PharmD program who does not in its judgment show sufficient promise to justify continuation, regardless of her/his academic record.  If a student’s performance, including academic record, promise, or professional conduct is considered unsatisfactory, the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will make appropriate recommendations regarding the student’s continuation to the associate dean for professional education.  The Committee will decide whether a student should be allowed to enter a review program (including appropriate reexamination), enter a decelerated curriculum, repeat a portion of an academic year or entire year, take a leave of absence with conditions upon return, or be dismissed.  The recommendation for a dismissal or for a leave of absence will be transmitted to the associate dean for professional education for final dispensation.

Academic Guidelines for Progression in the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

  1. Students must demonstrate acceptable knowledge and/or skills in all courses and practice experiences in the doctor of pharmacy curriculum.  Acceptable knowledge and/or skills are determined through evaluation of student performance that reflects objectives or competencies defined for each course within the context of competencies defined for the PharmD curriculum.  Acceptable knowledge and/or skills in all courses administered by the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy are denoted by any of the grades A, B, or C (or H or P in practice experiences and approved courses).
  2. Students who do not demonstrate acceptable knowledge and/or skills will be given the grade F.  A student who receives an F grade in a required course must remedy that grade, which must include the demonstration of acquisition of acceptable knowledge and/or skill for that course.  The student may not enroll in subsequent courses for which the “failed” course serves as a prerequisite until the student has passed the prerequisite course.  A student who again receives an F grade upon repeating a course, or who receives F grades in two or more required courses is subject to dismissal from the PharmD curriculum.  The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will determine whether such a student will be allowed to continue in the PharmD curriculum, and, if allowed to continue, specify conditions for continuation.
  3. The temporary grades of IN (incomplete) and AB (absent from the final examination) can be used consistent with the guidelines within the Undergraduate Bulletin or the Graduate School Handbook.
  4. Students admitted to the PharmD curriculum must complete the curriculum within five academic years from entry into the Program (including any leaves of absenses), subject to review of individual circumstances by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee.

Policy on Final Grade Appeal

The student must first attempt to resolve any disagreement with the course coordinator.  If the student fails to reach a satisfactory resolution, the student may appeal the grade in accordance with the following Policy on Final Grade Appeal:

  • The student must submit the appeal in writing along with a description of the results of the communication with the coordinator, any relevant test papers/term papers/graded materials to the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee.  The information that the student presents to the Committee will be shared with the involved course coordinator who will be given an opportunity to respond to the student’s appeal.  The student’s appeal should be made as soon as possible, but must be made within 5 business days after the official end of semester grades are reported for the course in question.

Appropriate Grounds for Final Grade Appeal

For an appeal of a final course grade to be considered, it must be based upon one or more of the following grounds and upon allegation that the ground or grounds cited influenced the grade assignment to the student’s detriment:

  • arithmetic or clerical error
  • arbitrariness, possibly including discrimination or harassment based upon the student’s race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression
  • personal malice
  • student conduct cognizable under the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance

Policy on Non-Academic Progression

The faculty of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy has a legal and ethical responsibility to protect members of the public and of the health care community from unsafe, unethical, or unprofessional pharmacy practices.  The School is charged with preparation of competent pharmacists. Because competence must be assured not only in the knowledge and technical abilities of the student, but also in their standards of personal and professional conduct, student progress is carefully monitored to certify that students have acquired and can demonstrate appropriate knowledge, skills, behavioral characteristics, and ethical principles.

The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee reserves the right to dismiss or sanction a doctor of pharmacy candidate at the end of any semester, regardless of the student’s grades, if the student does not, in the judgment of the Committee, show sufficient promise to justify allowing the student to continue the study of pharmacy.  Repeated failure to demonstrate professionalism, consistent with published codes of ethics for pharmacists (ex. APhA & NCAP) and the School’s Technical Standards, with respect to the management of patients or in interactions with other students, staff, faculty or preceptors constitutes grounds for dismissal.  Any acts or patterns of behavior consistent with physical, emotional, or behavioral problems, that impair the student’s ability to interact effectively with others, prevent others from fully participating in the educational process, endanger the well-being of the student or others, threaten patient safety or confidentiality, discredit the profession, or in any other way that raises serious questions about the student’s fitness for professional practice will serve as a basis for review by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee. Any student who fails to participate in or does not respond to appropriate interventions (eg. treatment, counseling, community service, additional or repeated course or clerkship requirements) within a specified period of time is subject to dismissal from the Program.  These non-academic factors serve as critical indicators of the student’s capacity to deliver a high standard of health care, meeting all technical, ethical, and legal requirements, and thus are considered by the faculty to be of equal importance with academic performance when making progression decisions.

If a faculty member or a student colleague believes there is evidence supporting a non-academic progression policy violation for a particular student, they should follow the guidelines listed below under Procedure for Dismissal (or Sanction) based on Non-Academic Performance.  The Committee will decide if a dismissal or a sanction is an appropriate action.

Leaves of Absence

Students enrolled in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy who wish to take a leave of absence may return to the School within one year of the date of leave. All leaves must be approved by the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs. Students desiring to take a leave of absence should schedule a meeting with the director of curricular & student affairs to discuss the leave of absence and readmission process. Students who have been absent from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy for more than one year from last enrollment must reapply for admission to the School and must compete for readmission with the other applicants for the entering class in that year. In situations involving medical leave, it is possible to extend the one year leave on a case by case basis. If the student is readmitted to the School, the Scholastic Achievement and Progressions Committee will review completed coursework and make recommendations for completing the program. Students may be required to re-take some or all of previously completed coursework in the School of Pharmacy or complete competency testing.

Decisions Rendered by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee

Decisions rendered by the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee may include, but are not limited to:  adjustment of academic load; repetition of course or curriculum segments; participation in psychological counseling or other services offered on-campus (e.g., the writing center, tutoring, learning disabilities), academic probation, and dismissal.

The Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee is not permitted to change the evaluation of student performance by the course coordinator unless there are grounds for appeal (see section on Final Grade Appeal).

Academic Probation:  Students will be placed on academic probation for one year (subsequent fall and spring semesters) after they receive a grade of F in any required course.  Students who are on academic probation shall not be allowed to:

  • Serve as officers or committee members in any School of Pharmacy organization
  • Participate in University extracurricular activities

Dismissal:  Students may be dismissed from the School of Pharmacy for any of the following reasons:

Receive grades of F in two or more required courses

Persistent failure to demonstrate adherence to academic or non-academic responsibilities, including Technical Standards for the School of Pharmacy

Attitudinal, behavioral, or criminal problems which interfere with the student’s responsibilities and progress through the curriculum

Dismissal from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Procedure for Dismissal based on Academic Performance:

  • Students who are in jeopardy of dismissal from the School of Pharmacy will be notified by the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee at least 5 business days prior to the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee meeting, at which a decision will be made.
  • Students so desiring may provide a written plea to the Committee noting their circumstances and any evidence that they feel is relevant and appropriate to bring forth.  If the student does not respond to the Committee Chair within 5 business days, the Committee will make its decision in the absence of such information.
  • The Committee will make its decision known to the associate dean for professional education, who will notify the student in writing of the Committee’s decision.

Procedure for Dismissal (or Sanction) based on Non-Academic Performance:

  • When, in the judgment of a faculty member or a student colleague, a student’s behavior constitutes conduct of a nature that warrants dismissal (or sanction), the faculty member or student colleague shall so notify the Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee in writing.
  • The Chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee will then notify the student and the faculty member or student colleague in writing within two weeks of the request as to the time and place for the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee hearing to determine whether, in the Committee’s judgment the dismissal (or sanction) is warranted.  A minimum of 72 hours notification will be given for the hearing.
  • The Committee will hold a closed hearing at which the faculty member or student colleague may be present and provide oral or written evidence regarding the behavior that in the faculty member’s or student colleague’s judgment is grounds for dismissal (or sanction).  The student may be present and given an opportunity to provide oral or written evidence regarding his/her behavior.  The evidentiary proceedings will be recorded.  Support persons, including legal counsel, cannot participate in the hearing process.  Failure of the student to participate or be present, will not stop the proceedings of the Committee.
  • Following the evidentiary presentation, the Committee will convene in executive session to determine whether dismissal or other recommendations are warranted.
  • The Committee shall make its decision known in writing to the Associate Dean for Professional Education, the student, and the person initiating the charge.

Note:  Some student conduct may be both an unsafe or unprofessional pharmacy practice and also an offense under the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance.  In such a case, the matter will be referred first to the pharmacy student attorney general.  If the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior does not constitute an offense under the Instrument, the School of Pharmacy will proceed under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression.  If the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior constitutes an offense under the Instrument and that there is sufficient evidence to charge the student with an offense, the case will be heard by the Pharmacy Honor Court.  If the Honor Court finds the student guilty of behavior that would also call the student’s professional fitness into question, the School of Pharmacy will consider the behavior under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression.  However, if the pharmacy student attorney general determines that the alleged behavior would constitute an offense under the Instrument but that there is insufficient evidence to charge the student, the matter will not be considered under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression.  Similarly, if the student is charged but the Honor Court finds the student not guilty, the matter will not be considered further under this Policy for Non-Academic Progression.

Policy for Appeal of Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee Decision

A decision of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee may be appealed in writing by the student, if done so within 5 business days of the receipt of the letter notifying them of the decision.  The written appeal should be addressed and delivered to the dean of the School of Pharmacy.  The decision of the dean of the School is the final stage in the appeals process.

It is the student’s responsibility to maintain contact (including current address, phone, and email information in Student Central) with the chair of the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee to ensure that the student promptly receives all relevant communications.  If the student fails to maintain contact (including current address, phone, and email information in Student Central) with the chair, decisions made in the student’s absence will nonetheless be binding.

Policy on Prohibited Harassment and Discrimination

The University’s Policy on Prohibited Harassment and Discrimination (www.unc.edu/campus/policies/harassanddiscrim.pdf) prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of an individual’s race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.  Appendix B of this Policy provides specific information for students who believe that they have been discriminated against or harassed on the basis of one or more of these protected classifications.

Students who want additional information regarding the University’s process for investigating allegations of discrimination or harassment should contact the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office for assistance:

Equal Opportunity/ADA Office

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

100 E. Franklin Street, Unit 110

Campus Box 9160

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599

Telephone: (919) 966-3576

Fax: (919) 962-2562

Email: equalopportunity@unc.edu

Any administrator or supervisor, including a department chair, associate dean or other administrator, who receives a student’s complaint about prohibited harassment or discrimination must notify the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office within five (5) calendar days of receiving the complaint.  If a student raises a claim of prohibited harassment or discrimination during an academic appeal, an investigation of the student’s claim must be performed under the direction of the Equal Opportunity/ADA Office.  The school or department must await the results of the harassment or discrimination investigation before deciding the student’s academic appeal.

To be eligible for graduation, all students must successfully complete four (4) professional electives totaling eight (8) or more semester hours. All four (4) professional electives must be completed after enrollment in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy but before the initiation of PY4 clerkships. No coursework completed as part of pre-pharmacy coursework and/or a prior degree can be accepted for professional elective credit.

Although the majority of students choose to take all four (4) electives within the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, the following requirements apply:

  • School of Pharmacy Electives: At least two (2) of the professional electives (minimum of 4 credit hours) must be taught by faculty of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, OR must be one of the interdisciplinary courses in which pharmacy faculty participate. All four electives may be selected from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy courses if desired.
  • Health Affairs Electives: One (1) of the four electives may be selected from the Health Affairs course listings approved by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee. Any health affairs elective of interest outside of this listing, must be approved by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee (see section below entitled “Deviations from the Policies”). See list below.
  • Free Electives: One (1) of the four electives may be a free elective. Any 1 to 3 credit hour course offered by UNC-Chapel Hill will satisfy this requirement, regardless of subject. Students who are enrolled on a satellite campus may take courses offered by the University where the satellite campus is located, ECSU or UNC-Asheville, to fulfill this requirement. Any free elective of interest not included in the above description (e.g., a course taken at another university), must be approved by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee (see section below entitled “Deviations from the Policies”). Note: For courses taken outside of UNC-Chapel Hill, the name of the university where the course was taken will appear on the student’s transcript as fulfilling the credit hours. However, the name of the course or the grade will not appear on the student’s transcript and grades for these courses will not be calculated into the student’s GPA, per University policy.

Deviations from the Policies

Petitions for individualized plans of study (any elective course work that deviates from these guidelines) must be approved, in advance, by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee. Petitions must be made in writing and submitted a minimum of 45 days prior to the semester in which you wish to enroll in the course. These petitions may be submitted via email to the School registrar who serves on the Curriculum and Assessment Committee.

Independent Study and Research Electives

Independent studies are a mechanism for students to work with faculty on a specific, focused topic for academic credit. These courses may be classified by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee as a health affairs or free elective. Because of the focus, independent study topics are typically not included in scheduled courses. Most commonly, independent study in the School of Pharmacy is directed or mentored research.

Students registering for independent studies must be in good academic standing.  A maximum of six (6) credit hours of independent study may be applied toward the professional elective requirements (2 to 3 credits per semester).  For each credit hour awarded, a minimum of three hours of independent work per week is required and a final written paper or report is required. Syllabi for independent study courses are due to the registrar by June 1 for fall courses and November 1 for spring courses.

Students enrolled in the Honor’s Program should not utilize independent study to accomplish requirements of their research project (e.g., final write-up, presentation); however, they may undertake independent study to extend their project to address newly identified study aims. Students working in the lab of a faculty member cannot get paid for work completed on their honor’s project or work completed for the independent study credit.

Each independent study course requires a syllabus, which will be reviewed by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee for the below minimum contents. After review of the course, the Committee will determine the classification of the independent study as a health affairs or free elective, depending on the focus.

 

Independent Study Minimum Requirements to be Included in the Syllabus

(Note: See syllabus checklist and template on Faculty Resources webpage for more detail and/or examples of syllabi. The below items are the minimal requirements to be included in an independent study syllabus)

  • Instructor of record
  • Hours per week (e.g., 3 hours per week if 1 credit hours)
  • Meeting requirements (e.g., individual meetings, lab meetings, etc.)
  • Reading assignments and due dates if relevant
  • Written assignments (page requirements/limits and due dates, if relevant)
  • Description of other assignments
  • Assessment (e.g., % of course grade based on each requirement) including final examination or alternate format
  • Work plan

Interdisciplinary and Certificate Program Opportunities

A number of interdisciplinary and specialized certificate programs are currently under development at the University. Once approved by the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, courses required for such programs may be used to satisfy the doctor of pharmacy professional elective requirements, regardless of whether they adhere to the guidelines stated above, provided that the student can document acceptance into the program. Students wishing to complete one of the programs should note that these additional course requirements may not fit easily into the PharmD course structure, and may extend the students time to graduation.

Grading for Professional Elective Courses

Grading for professional electives will follow the normal grading scheme used by the course:

  • for graduate level courses, grading will be assigned on the H, P, L, F scale
  • for PharmD level courses, grading will either be Pass/Fail or A, B, C, F
  • for undergraduate courses in health affairs or arts and sciences, the University’s A, B, C, D, F scale will be applied.
  • for independent study courses, grading will either be Pass/Fail or A, B, C, F

Elective Grading under the Pass/Fail System

Students may choose to take two (2) electives for Pass/Fail credit under the following University guidelines:

  • Students must be registered for at least nine (9) hours of letter grade credit during the semester in which they take an elective course for Pass/Fail credit.
  • No more than four (4) credit hours during a single semester (one elective course and one physical education activity course) can be taken Pass/Fail.
  • A maximum of eleven (11) hours of Pass/Fail credit may be applied to graduation requirements.
  • General College requirements may not be taken for Pass/Fail.
  • Some professional elective courses taught in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy may NOT be taken pass/fail. Please review course descriptions carefully before registering for professional elective courses.

Note: Required pharmacy courses and clerkships graded solely on a H/P/F basis or graduate level courses that are graded solely on a H/P/L/F basis are not counted toward the hours limitations described above for courses that you electively declare “pass/fail” under the University’s Pass/Fail declaration guidelines for elective courses.

 

Policy Approved 5/21/2003; Amended 3/21/2013

To be eligible for graduation, all students must successfully complete a minimum of four (4) professional electives totaling eight (8) or more credit hours. All four (4) professional electives must be completed after enrollment in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, but before the initiation of PY4 advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). No coursework completed as part of a pre-pharmacy program and/or a prior degree can be accepted for professional elective credit.

Although students may choose to take all four (4) electives within the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, students may take a limited number of credits outside of the school. The following requirements apply:

  • Electives within the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy: At least two (2) of the professional electives (minimum of 4 credit hours) must be taught by faculty of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, OR must be one of the interdisciplinary courses in which pharmacy faculty participate. Students may choose to have all electives originate from the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.
  • Electives outside of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy: Up to two (2) of the professional electives may be selected from other Schools or Departments on campus, including the UNC online course catalog.
  • Health Affairs Electives: One (1) or up to two (2) of the four professional electives may be selected from the Health Affairs course listings approved by the Curriculum Committee (Appendix A).
  • Free Electives: Only one (1) of the four professional electives may be a free elective, although a free elective is not required. This includes any 1 to 3 credit hour course(s) offered by UNC-Chapel Hill, including online courses through Carolina Courses Online or UNC Online (see below). Students enrolled on the Asheville satellite campus may take courses offered by UNC-Asheville to fulfill this requirement.

Note: For courses taken outside of UNC-Chapel Hill, per University policy, the name of the university where the course was taken will appear on the student’s transcript as fulfilling the credit hours. However, the name of the course, or the grade will not appear on the student’s transcript. Grades for these courses will not be calculated into the student’s GPA.

 

Exceptions to the Elective Policy

Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy

 Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy is a pathway within the elective curriculum that is built around a mentored, in-depth, scholarly project where a student will: (1) frame an answerable question with a faculty member; (2) generate and interpret relevant data; and, (3) communicate their findings in an oral and written forum. This experience could include hypothesis-driven research (e.g., preclinical, translational, clinical, epidemiologic, health services, educational) or non-hypothesis driven research (e.g., method development and validation, quality improvement).

 Students that enter this pathway will register for Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy in the PY2 spring, PY3 fall, and PY3 spring semesters (for a total of six elective credit hours). These three (3) courses and six (6) credit hours will count towards fulfillment of their elective requirements. Students in this pathway are required to take a minimum of 2 additional credit hours of electives to fulfull their elective requirements. These two credit hours must be fulfilled by a School of Pharmacy or Health Affairs elective. Students working in the laboratory/research program of a faculty member cannot be paid for any work completed as part of the requirements for the Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy pathway.

Deviations from the Policies

Petitions for individualized plans of study (any elective course work that deviates from these guidelines) must be approved, in advance, by the Curriculum Committee. Petitions must be made in writing and submitted a minimum of 45 days prior to the semester in which you wish to enroll in the course. These petitions may be submitted via email to the School registrar, who serves on the Curriculum Committee.

Independent Studies

Independent studies are a mechanism for students to briefly work with faculty in a limited capacity on a specific, focused topic for academic credit. Under special circumstances, academic, elective credit may be approved for an independent study by the Curriculum Committee. These courses may be classified by the Curriculum Committee as a Health Affairs or Free Elective. Because of the focus, independent study topics are typically not identified in scheduled courses. Most commonly, an independent study in the School of Pharmacy is designed as directed or mentored research. In this case, students are encouraged to use research time allocated in the Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy or PIPS Phase 3 course offerings, as opposed to independent study, to obtain course credit for directed or mentored projects.

Students registering for independent studies must be in good academic standing. A maximum of three (3) credit hours of independent study may be applied toward the professional elective requirements. For each credit hour awarded, a minimum of three hours of independent work per week is required and a final written paper or report is required. Syllabi for independent study courses are due to the registrar by June 1 for fall courses and November 1 for spring courses.

Students enrolled in Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy may not concurrently register for independent study. Additionally, students working in the laboratory/research program of a faculty member cannot be paid for any work completed as part of independent study course credit.

Each independent study course requires a syllabus, which will be reviewed by the Curriculum Committee for the below minimum contents. After review of the course, the Curriculum Committee will determine the classification of the independent study as a Health Affairs or Free Elective, depending on the focus.

Independent Study Minimum Requirements to be Included in the Syllabus
Note: See syllabus checklist and template on Faculty Resources webpage for more detail and/or examples of syllabi. The below items are the minimal requirements to be included in an independent study syllabus.

  • Instructor of record
  • Hours per week (e.g., 3 hours per week if 1 credit hours)
  • Meeting requirements (e.g., individual meetings, lab meetings, etc.)
  • Reading assignments and due dates if relevant
  • Written assignments (page requirements/limits and due dates, if relevant)
  • Description of other assignments
  • Assessment (e.g., % of course grade based on each requirement) including final examination or alternate format
  • Work plan

 

Grading for Professional Elective Courses

Grading for professional electives will follow the normal grading scheme used by the course:

  • Graduate level courses: grading will be assigned on the H, P, L, F scale
  • PharmD level courses: grading will either be H (High Pass), P (Pass), F (Fail); Pass/Fail or A, B, C, F
  • Undergraduate courses in health affairs or arts and sciences: grading will follow the University’s A, B, C, D, F scale
  • Independent study courses: grading will either be Pass/Fail or A, B, C, F

Elective Grading under the Pass/Fail System

Students may take only one (1) elective, including independent studies, for Pass/Fail credit under the following University guidelines:

  • Students must be registered for at least nine (9) hours of letter grade credit during the semester in which they take an elective course for Pass/Fail credit.
  • No more than four (4) credit hours during a single semester (one elective course and one physical education activity course) can be taken Pass/Fail.
  • A maximum of eleven (11) hours of Pass/Fail credit may be applied to graduation requirements.
  • General College requirements may not be taken for Pass/Fail.

Note:

Pharmacy courses and pharmacy practice experiences graded soley on a H/P/F basis or graduate level courses that are graded soley on a H/P/L/F basis are not counted toward the hours limitations described above for courses that you electively declare “Pass/Fail” under the University’s Pass/Fail declaration guidelines for elective courses.

Some professional elective courses taught in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy may NOT be taken Pass/Fail. Please review course descriptions carefully before registering for professional elective courses.


Appendix A: Health Affairs Eelctives Approved by the Curriculum Committee

Petitions for individualized plans of study (any elective course work that deviates from the elective policy) must be approved, in advance, by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee. Petitions must be made in writing and submitted a minimum of 45 days prior to the semester in which you wish to enroll in the course. These petitions may be submitted via email to the School registrar who serves on the Curriculum and Assessment Committee.

Definition of Health Affairs Electives: Electives that enhance a student’s ability to improve patient health

 

Courses Offered on the UNC-CH Campus

  • Anthropology 470 – Medicine and Anthropology (3 hrs)
  • Biostatistics – Principles of Statistical Inference (variety of courses)
  • English 303 – Advanced Expository Writing for Natural Sciences (3 hrs )
  • Epidemiology 600 – Principles of Epidemiology (3 hrs)
  • Exercise and Sport Science 188 – Emergency Care of Injuries and Illness (3 hrs)
  • Geography 445 – Medical Geography (3 hrs)
  • Health Behavior and Health Education 709 – U.S. Populations of Color (3 hrs)
  • Health Behavior and Health Education 727 – Patient Advocacy (3 hrs)
  • Health Behavior and Health Education 772 – Planning and Public Health Interventions (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 220 – Writing for Health Administrators (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 230 – Management of Human Resources (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 330 – Introduction to Organization Leadership, Management, and Behavior (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 340 – Foundations of Health Care Financial Management (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 510 – Global Perspectives on Ethical Issues in Health Policy and Management (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 715 – Health Economics for Policy and Management (3 hrs)
  • Health Policy and Management 757 – Health Reform: Political Dynamics and Policy Dilemmas (3 hrs)
  • Microbiology and Immunology 614 – Immuniobiology (3 hrs)
  • Microbiology and Immunology 630 – Virology (3 hrs)
  • Microbiology and Immunology 631 – Advanced Molecular Biology I (3 hrs)
  • Nursing 870 – Health Care Informatics (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 240 – Introduction to Human Nutrition (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 400 – Introduction to Nutritional Biochemistry (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 600 – Human Metabolism: Macronutrients (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 611 – Nutrition of Children and Mothers (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 620 – Human Metabolism: Micronutrients (3 hrs)
  • Nutrition 700 – Nutrition in Medicine (2 hrs)
  • Psychology 101 – General Psychology (3 hrs)
  • Psychology 245 – Abnormal Psychology (3 hrs)
  • Psychology 250 – Child Development (3 hrs)
  • Psychology 320 – Drugs and Human Behavior (3 hrs)
  • Psychology 502 – Psychology of Adulthood and Aging (3 hrs)
  • Public Health 420 – AIDS: Principles and Policy (1 hr)
  • Public Health 610 – Introductory Spanish for Health Professionals (3 hr)
  • Public Health 613i – Intermediate Spanish for Health Care I (3 hr)
  • Public Health 615i – Advanced Spanish for Health Care I (3 hr)
  • Sociology 431 – Aging (3 hrs)
  • Women’s and Gender Studies 563 – Introduction to Women’s Health and Health Education (3 hr)

 

Courses Offered at Other Universities Online

Note: For courses taken outside of UNC-Chapel Hill, the name of the university where the course was taken will appear on the student’s transcript as fulfilling the credit hours. However, the name of the course or the grade will not appear on the student’s transcript and grades for these courses will not be calculated in the student’s GPA, per University policy.

  • PHA 505 – Community Pharmacy Ownership – Mercer University (2 hrs)
  • Pharmaceutical Care and Compounds for Veterinary Patients – Professional Compounding Centers of America (PCCA) (2 hrs)
  • PHARM 720 – Introduction to Nuclear Pharmacy – The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (2 hrs)
  • PHA 6935 – Veterinary Pharmacy – University of Florida (2 hrs)
  • SW 6860 – School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies – The University of Utah (1 hr)*

Health Affairs Electives list last updated 8/20/14

*The University of Utah awards 2.0 hours for course completion. 1.0 hour can be transferred to fulfill PharmD elective requirements.

 

Policy Approved 5/21/2003; Amended 2/4/2013; Amended 7/11/2016

Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs) are one of the many assessment methods included in the School’sAssessment for Improvement plan. OSCEs provide a systematic approach to authentic student assessment and are used to assess students’ clinical and communication skill development across the doctor of pharmacy curriculum. OSCEs consist of a circuit of stations through which a range of clinical and communication skills are assessed by standardized patient examiners using objective scoring rubrics. Doctor of pharmacy students complete a total of fifteen OSCE standardized patient (SP) encounters during the first three years of the curriculum in order to assess a variety of skills needed to deliver effective patient care. These may include patient assessment and problem identification; device or medication use counseling; demonstration of drug administration or patient monitoring techniques; and communication and interpersonal skills. Feedback from the OSCEs enables students, faculty and preceptors to better understand and tailor subsequent instruction to students’ strengths and areas for improvement.

OSCEs are a required element of the doctor of pharmacy curriculum. Students must pass each OSCE to satisfy requirements for completing the PharmD program. Students who miss an OSCE for either excused or unexcused reasons or arrive too late to be worked into the SP rotation, will receive an “incomplete” in the course through which the OSCE or SP exercise was administered. A final course grade will be given when the OSCE is completed, usually in the next academic year. Excused absences are granted only for students with a personal illness or injury on the day of the exam documented by a health-care provider. Students with unexcused absences will receive a grade of zero for the exam or exercise but must still complete the activity in the next academic year.

No make-up sessions are provided during the semester in which an OSCE or other SP exercise is missed, even for excused absences. Students who miss an OSCE in the PY2 year will be required to complete the requirement during their PY3 year. Students may not begin advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) until all OSCE requirements are completed: failure to complete an OSCE during the normal course cycle may delay the student’s progression to APPEs and graduation. It may be possible to arrange a make-up session for third-professional-year students who miss an OSCE to prevent a delay in beginning APPEs. In such cases, the student will be responsible for the costs incurred in repeating an OSCE outside of the normal course schedule (i.e. costs for standardized patients, facilities, staff and materials). OSCE costs range from $200 to $500 per student, depending on the specific nature of the cases. The student will be notified in advance of his or her financial responsibility.

Preamble

The availability of sophisticated technology can, if used appropriately, assist faculty in their teaching by facilitating student learning. However, regardless of the technology that is brought to bear in the classroom, we recognize that the School is a community of educators and learners, and that the success of our educational mission is dependent on the interactions (among students and between faculty and students) that occur in such a community. As we become more proficient in our use of technology, an interactive community may extend outside the borders of our classrooms. Our present technology, in some instances, allows for such interactivity from locations outside of the classroom; however we have not yet developed the tools to evaluate the outcome of a highly decentralized learning environment. In addition, we have not yet grappled with the legal issues associated with the potential for permanent distribution of what might be considered to be an individual faculty member’s intellectual property. Consequently, the School has adopted the following policy concerning access to class recordings.

Policy Statements

1)    Student access to Adobe Connect during class is prohibited.

2)    The intent of the course recordings is to guard against catastrophic events that disrupt the ability of the three campus sites to either communicate or conduct classes simultaneously. Such catastrophic events include dropping the transmission between the campuses and weather-related (or other) events that force the closing of the campus on the “receiving end” of the signal. In these cases, all students in the class will be given access to the relevant archived session(s).

3)    All lectures will be recorded for classes that are videoteleconferenced but only lectures that are released by the course director will actually be posted. Access to recorded files that are not posted will be restricted to key personnel in the School. Files of lectures that have been recorded but not posted will not be released to anyone else without authorization of the instructor.

a.    Each course will have their own policy regarding the release of course recordings. The release of recordings will be based on various elements including class format and instructional goals. This policy will appear in the course syllabus and be discussed on the first day of class. Course directors are provided with a guidance document to assist them in determining the appropriateness of releasing class recordings.

b.    For courses where class recordings are released, each course will have their own policy to guard against potential drop in attendance. This policy will appear in the course syllabus and be discussed on the first day of class. Course directors are provided with a guidance document to assist them in developing a policy that is consistent with their teaching philosophy and format of the course.

4)    Students will be required to sign a student attestation form (Appendix 5) that clearly states the limitation of their usage of the posted lecture recordings and other course material on the School’s learning management software system (e.g, Blackboard or Sakai). Collection and archiving of these forms would be performed by the Office of Student Services. The forms will be distributed and collected during orientation, and lecture recordings will not be posted unless all registered students have turned in a signed form.

5)    In year one of a particular class or course, the default option will be that the class will not be released to students unless the course director has consented (i.e., opt-in option).

6)    Faculty members who have previously declined to have their lectures posted can change their mind at the end of their lecture and agree to have their class posted.

7)    Classes will only be available in streaming format and cannot be downloaded to individual personal computers.

a.    Links to recorded classes will be removed by July or the end of each academic year.

8)    The lecture recording system will be set up so that it automatically records each lecture as scheduled plus all except the last minute of the time scheduled between that class and the beginning of the next lecture so that the majority of classes that run a little long will be recorded intact.

a.    Links for each class will be emailed to faculty or a designate (e.g., teaching assistant) at the end of the day.

b.    For links to be accessed by students, the links will be placed on a protected Web site (e.g., Blackboard or its equivalent) that is only available to UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy students.

9)    For courses that do not release course recordings, under very limited circumstances class recordings may be provided to individual students by the authority of the course director. Course directors have been provided guidelines for which these circumstances may occur.

10)    In some cases, class meetings or activities that fall outside of the normal lecture schedule (e.g., review sessions) may be recorded. Due to potential conflicts in the scheduling of such sessions, there may be value in allowing students to access this material asynchronously. Consequently, students may be given access to this material at the discretion of the course director. The impact of this access on attendance at review sessions or other class meetings will be evaluated, and the policy adjusted as necessary.

11)    The School through various entities (e.g., Curriculum Committee, Center for Educational Excellence in Pharmacy) will monitor the use of class recordings and course policies. This information will be made available to faculty to facilitate future decisions regarding the release of class recordings.

This policy will be reviewed regularly by the Executive Committee to keep pace with the rapidly changing instructional technology environment of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy.

Appendix 1: Guidance on the appropriateness for release of course recordings

Several factors may impact decisions to release course recordings. These factors mainly relate to course format. In addition, having access to course recordings may lower the threshold for students in attending class. A brief summary of recommendations can be found below:

Student Handbook Ap1 recommended graph

Lecture (most appropriate): The traditional lecture is ‘teacher-centered’ and a one-way transmission of information with little student-instructor interaction. The lecture model parallels the delivery methods found in a textbook. As with textbooks, students in a traditional lecture course may benefit from multiple reviews of the material. In addition, lectures are typically fast paced and thus information can be missed by students. Research has demonstrated that in traditional lecture-type courses with good note sets or textbooks, student performance is fairly independent of attendance – that is, attending class is unnecessary as information can be obtained elsewhere. In extreme cases at some institutions, lecture-type classes do not meet and students obtain nearly all information from pre-taped lectures.

Lecture with active learning: Incorporating active learning within a lecture format moves the course into a more student-centered approach. Gains in learning are achieved when students participate in class. Therefore, watching lectures is not as effective as attending class and participating in those class activities. The appropriateness of releasing class recordings will depend on the balance between lecture and active learning activities. The more active learning activities, the less appropriate releasing class recordings may be.

Discussion/Cooperative Learning (least appropriate): This course or class format is very student-centered and is focused on student-faculty interaction. The benefit comes to the student through active participation in class. Class recordings, though potentially minimally beneficial to students, reduces the need for students to participate and promotes voyeuristic learning. Student performance is enhanced in these models if students are actively engaged. These courses are by nature slower in pace than lectures and students are less likely to miss important points. Releasing class recordings in these formats may hinder the instructor’s goals in setting up the class environment because of reduced student attendance or participation.

Appendix 2: Methods to prevent attendance drop-off

There are several methods in which instructors can reduce attendance drop-off due to releasing course recordings. It is up to the individual course director to develop a philosophy on how to best address the issue of attendance. Some of the more commonly used methods are listed here:

  • Unannounced quizzes: Sporadic quizzes or other assessments can encourage students to attend class as they may not know if there will be an assessment that day. If this method is to be implemented, the course syllabus should clearly outline how those points contribute to the course grade, the approximate amount of quizzes, and the points associated with a quiz.
  • Grades for participation: Grades for participation are linked to student attendance as they have to be present to participate. There are many variations on how to incorporate participation into the course grade. As with any policy, the syllabus must articulate participation expectations, have an assessment of that expectation and have a description of how participation impacts the course grade.
  • Grades for attendance: Much like the ‘grades for participation’, grades can be assigned for simply showing up to class. Several courses have attendance policies which state students are only allowed to miss X amount of classes.
  • Limited access to archives: Establishing a course policy where students have limited access to archives either temporally (e.g., students can only have access within 3 days of a given class session) or quantitatively (e.g., a student is allowed to view only 3 course recordings in a given course) can promote attendance. Temporal access allows students to review and update their notes and prevents students from watching all recordings just before the exam. Quantal access allows students to miss classes without feeling they missed material but does not make them dependent on the recordings.
  • Increasing active student participation: If students find value in attending either because the information discussed in class is building upon the reading material versus simply repeating the reading material or that students gain something by attending class (e.g., better understanding of material) they are more likely to attend. Students who do not attend class miss class either because they feel their time is better spent somewhere else or they can pass the course without attending.

Appendix 3: Guidance to course directors for releasing course recordings in response to student requests

There are circumstances when individual students or small groups of students will ask permission to view class recordings. The following are guidelines to assist the course director in determining when it may or may not be appropriate to release the recordings. For additional guidance or for circumstances not listed here, course directors may contact the Assistant Dean for Professional Education.

Appropriate Use

1)    The School encourages student attendance at state and national professional meetings. As a result, access to class recordings will be allowed when a group of students is not able to attend class due to attendance at certain professional state or national meetings (specifically, NCAP, ASHP, APhA, ACCP, SNPhA). The recordings can be made available to all students in the class for five business days after the meeting ends.

2)    There are situations when students must miss class for extended lengths of time (ex. hospitalization, death in the immediate family, etc.). In these cases, students may request access to the class recordings. Proof of illness or death in the immediate family may be required.

Less-Appropriate Use

1)    Missing class due to personal vacation or leaving early for a holiday weekend.

2)    Missing class for a doctor’s appointment

Example of language to include in the syllabus for the release of course recordings, with two options presented:

Consistent with School policy, the release of class recordings is at the discretion of the course director and is based on many factors, including course goals, instructor’s teaching philosophy, and the course design.

[Select one option]

Option 1: For this course, students will have access to class recordings and recordings will be posted on Blackboard after each class. If you want to have a time limit on how long they will be posted, state it here (for example, 3 days, 1 week, or until the end of the course). Also stipulate any other limitations here.

Option 2: For this course, students will have access to course recordings only in the case of an excused absence. Examples of excused absences are serious illness, death in the immediate family, or attending a School-related conference.

Appendix 4: Student guidelines for course recordings

(Based on UC Berkley policy)

As part of the education and learning experience, students routinely take notes during class lectures. In addition, all courses that are videoteleconferenced also are recorded. Lecture notes and recordings involve issues related to the intellectual property rights of instructors and the privacy rights of students. To protect these rights, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy has adopted guidelines and policies governing these activities in the classroom.

Policy on Recordings of Academic Instructional Presentations

Distribution and Publication

No business, agency or person shall give, sell or otherwise distribute or publish course lecture notes, or any recording, in any medium, of any course given at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, nor use such lecture notes or recording for any commercial purpose without the written consent of the instructor and dean of the School.

Exception (Non-Commercial Lecture Notes & Sound Recordings)

Students enrolled in a course may take lecture notes and, with the permission of the instructor, make sound recordings of the class (video recordings are prohibited), for the purpose of individual or group study or for other noncommercial purposes reasonably arising from participation in the course. Students enrolled in or auditing a course may also provide such course lecture notes or sound recording to other students for the purpose of individual or group study or for other noncommercial purposes reasonably arising from participation in the course; to note, students must ask permission of the instructor prior to audio recording the class.

Capture of Sounds and Images

Recordings of classes at the School that capture the actual sounds and/or images of those classes, in any medium, shall not be distributed or communicated for commercial purposes without a written agreement between the instructor and the University. This prohibition includes recordings made by any person with the instructor’s written consent. Any such agreement must consider not only the rights of the instructor and the University, but also those of third parties. It may be necessary to secure rights from these third parties before any distribution or communication takes place. Unauthorized use of lecture notes or recordings is subject to the federal Copyright Act, North Carolina Civil Code, and University policy, and may subject an individual to honor code violation and legal proceedings brought by the instructor as well as action by the University.

The following policy will be followed in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in the absence of a defined missed -exam policy in an individual course syllabus.

Students are expected to be present for all midterm exams and the final exam unless arrangements are made with the course coordinator prior to administration of the exam. Make-up exams are not permitted for unexcused absences. Students who fail to attend an exam will be given a grade of zero for the exam. Only students providing medical documentation stating they were sick or injured on the day of the exam or providing proof of a death in the immediate family will be exempt from this rule.

In this case, the grade of the missed exam will be made up by one of the following options at the discretion of the course coordinator:

  1. Increasing the percentage of the remaining exams to cover the missed exam
  2. Assigning the final exam a higher percentage to cover the missed exam
  3. A make-up exam (not the original exam)
  4. If the final is cumulative, the section relating to the missed examination material can be used as the grade for that missed exam

Students are expected to attend class on the campus (Asheville or Chapel Hill) to which they have been offered enrollment. Students are not permitted to attend class at the other campus without written approval by the assistant director for the PharmD program in the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs.

Due to space limitations and procedural issues on both campuses, students must submit a special request to the assistant director for the PharmD program in the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs to attend class on an alternate campus including the following:

  • a planned special pharmacy-school event
  • to arrange a visit
  • any other special request

Note: Beginning with the Pharm.D. Class of 2019 (students entering the program in the fall of 2015 and beyond), the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences will no longer be offered or awarded to students who enter the program without a bachelors degree. Once enrolled in the Pharm.D. program, students without a bachelors degree will only work towards completing their Doctor of Pharmacy degree. 

If a student is admitted with remaining prerequisite courses, the degree is contingent upon completion of all prerequisite courses (University and School prerequisites) by the end of the fall semester of the third professional year.

If a student is admitted to the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy with remaining prerequisites, a transcript must be submitted from the school where courses were taken to the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the prerequisites that are remaining and take the proper coursework. Students who are unsure of transfer equivalences can visit our prerequisites page for more information. In addition, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy registrar can assist with transfer equivalencies.

In early spring of the third professional year, the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs will verify that all students eligible for the B.S. degree have completed all pre-requisite courses (both University and School pre-requisites).  If all pre-requisite courses have been satisfied, the student will be given the opportunity to apply for a B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree at the end of the spring semester in their third professional year.

The BS in pharmaceutical sciences is not required in order to receive the PharmD degree. The decision to apply for the BS lies with the student.

The University Registrar’s Office mails diplomas to the students during the following summer.

All enrollments through the third year (PY3) are included as a part of the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences undergraduate degree.

This degree will be included on a University transcript.

Students entering the PharmD program without a bachelor’s degree can be simultaneously working towards a BS in pharmaceutical sciences and a PharmD and are tracked as both undergraduate and PharmD professional within the University in order to recognize the dual nature of the program.

Students are awarded undergraduate financial aid for the first two years in the PharmD program (PY1-PY2 years). Whether students opt to receive the B. S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree is immaterial since they are in a program that is undergraduate and these students are meeting the requirements of that program.

During the third and fourth year of the PharmD program, financial aid is awarded at the professional level.

Personal Attributes and Capabilities Essential for Admission, Progression, and Graduation

Introduction

Earning a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree from The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill requires mastery of a coherent body of knowledge and skills. A pharmacy student must acquire substantial competence in the necessary knowledge and application of that knowledge in their professional practice and must be able to relate appropriately to patients, health care professionals, and to other ancillary personnel. Combinations of cognitive, affective, psychomotor, physical, and social abilities are required to perform these functions satisfactorily. These skills and functions are not only essential to the successful completion of the PharmD degree requirements, but they are also necessary to ensure the health and safety of patients, fellow students, faculty, and other health care providers.

In addition to required academic achievement and proficiency, the following technical standards describe non-academic qualifications the School considers essential for successful completion of the educational objectives of its curriculum. Therefore, in order to be admitted, to successfully progress, and to be approved for graduation, applicants for admission and current students must demonstrate the qualifications described below. Students who are unable to meet these standards will be referred to the Scholastic Achievement and Progression Committee for review. The Committee will determine if the student should be sanctioned or dismissed from the PharmD program.

Students who seek reasonable accommodations for a disability, medical condition or temporary injury/condition must contact UNC’s Office of Accessibility Resources & Service (www.accessibility.unc.edu). The Office will determine a student’s eligibility for and recommend appropriate accommodations and services.

Attitudinal, Behavioral, Interpersonal, and Emotional Attributes

Because the pharmacy profession is governed by ethical principles and by state and federal laws, a pharmacy student must have the capacity to learn and understand these values and laws and to perform within their guidelines. Students must be able to relate to colleagues, staff and patients with honesty, integrity, non-discrimination, self-sacrifice and dedication. They must be able to understand and use the power, special privileges, and trust inherent in the patient relationship for the patient’s benefit and to know and to avoid the behaviors that constitute misuse of this power. A pharmacy student must understand and comply with all policies and procedures related to Protected Health Information. They must demonstrate the capacity to examine and deliberate effectively about the social and ethical questions that define pharmacy and the pharmacist’s role and to reason critically about these questions. Students must be able to identify personal reactions and responses, recognize multiple points of view, and integrate these appropriately into clinical decision-making.

Pharmacy students must be of sufficient emotional health to utilize fully their intellectual ability, to exercise good judgment, to complete patient care responsibilities promptly, and to relate to patients, families, and colleagues with courtesy, compassion, maturity, and respect for their dignity. The ability to participate collaboratively and flexibly as a professional team member is essential. The pharmacy student must display this emotional health in spite of stressful working conditions, changing environments, and clinical uncertainties. The pharmacy student must be able to modify behavior in response to constructive criticism. A pharmacy student must be open to examining personal attitudes, perceptions, and stereotypes which may negatively affect patient care and professional relationships. An individual with a diagnosed mental health condition may function as a pharmacy student as long as the condition is managed sufficiently to allow accomplishment of the above goals with or without reasonable accommodation.* A pharmacy student must exhibit behavior and intellectual functioning which does not differ from acceptable standards. In the event of deteriorating emotional function, it is essential that a pharmacy student be willing to acknowledge the occurrence and/or accept professional help before the condition poses danger to self, patients, and/or colleagues.

Stamina

The study and ongoing practice of pharmacy may involve taxing workloads, competing obligations, and stressful situations. A pharmacy student must possess the physical and emotional stamina to maintain a high level of function in the face of such working conditions.

Intellectual Skills

A pharmacy student must possess a range of intellectual skills that allows the student to master the broad and complex body of knowledge that comprises a pharmacy education. This involves the assimilation of existing knowledge from a wide variety of sources and its application to professional practice. It also involves the synthesis of new knowledge through reasoning and the ability to think critically.

The student’s learning style must be effective and efficient. The ultimate goal will be to solve difficult problems and make recommendations for therapeutic decisions. A pharmacy student must be able to memorize, describe mechanisms of drug action and clearance, perform scientific measurement and calculation, and ultimately critically evaluate biomedical literature. Reasoning abilities must be sophisticated enough to analyze and synthesize information from a wide variety of sources. Pharmacy students must be able to gather data, develop a plan of action, establish priorities, and monitor treatment plans and modalities. A pharmacy student must be able to learn effectively through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to: classroom instruction, small group discussion/projects, individual study of materials, preparation and presentation of written and oral reports, and use of computer-based technology.

Communication Skills

A pharmacy student must be able to ask questions, to receive answers in an insightful manner, to record information about patients and to advise patients and other health care professionals. They must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with patients, their families, and with other members of the health care team. This must include spoken communications and non-verbal communications such as interpretation of facial expressions, affects, and body language. Mastery of both written and spoken English is required although applications from students with hearing and speech disabilities will be given full consideration. In such cases, use of a trained intermediary or other communications aide may be appropriate if this intermediary functions only as an information conduit and does not provide integrative or interpretive functions.

Visual, Auditory, Tactile and Motor Competencies

A pharmacy student must possess sufficient visual, auditory, tactile and motor abilities to allow the student to gather data from written reference material, from oral presentations, by observing demonstrations and experiments, by studying various types of medical illustrations, by observing a patient and the patient’s environment, by observing clinical procedures performed by others, and by reading digital or analog representations of physiologic phenomena. Additionally, pharmacy students must possess sufficient visual, auditory, tactile, and motor abilities to prepare medication dosage forms, administer medications to patients, and perform a basic physical examination of a patient.

*Reasonable accommodation means services provided to individuals with disabilities, medical conditions or temporary injury/condition that remove or lessen the effect of disability-related barriers. Examples include providing sign language interpreters, furnishing written materials in large print, and making a facility or event physically accessible. Some individuals with disabilities may need reasonable accommodations to meet the School’s Technical Standards, while others may not.

Students who seek reasonable accommodations for a disability, medical condition or temporary injury/condition must contact UNC’s Office of Accessibility Resources & Service (www.accessibility.unc.edu). The Office will determine a student’s eligibility for and recommend appropriate accommodations and services.

Note: The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is committed to equality of educational opportunity. The University does not discriminate in offering access to its educational programs and activities on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, genetic information, disability, veteran’s status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.

It is the responsibility of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy to ensure that all pharmacy-student-organization accounting practices are fiscally sound. In an effort to protect student organizations, their advisers, and the School, all student organizations officially recognized by or receiving funding from the Pharmacy Student Senate are required to use the Student Activities Fund Office (SAFO) for management of accounts. Bank accounts other than accounts through the SAFO office are not allowed. Student organizations not adhering to this policy will have their official recognition by the senate and funding allocations revoked until compliance with the policy ensues.

Overview and Policy

The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Foundation (“Pharmacy Foundation”) recognize the importance of professional development and networking opportunities provided to students by attendance at state, regional and national meetings. As a result, the Pharmacy Foundation provides travel stipends for currently enrolled doctor of pharmacy students to attend one professional meeting each academic year. The flat stipend amount awarded to each student can vary from year to year and is dependent on available funding. For the 2014-15 academic year, the travel stipend is $200 per student. Active participation in a professional meeting is required to ensure optimal use of travel funding.

Given the inherent value added to PharmD students, the state, regional, or national meetings of the organizations listed below qualify for the travel stipend:

    • ACCP – American College of Clinical Pharmacy
    • AMCP – Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy
    • APhA – American Pharmacists Association
    • ASCP – American Society of Consultant Pharmacists
    • ASHP – American Society of Health System Pharmacists
    • NCAP – North Carolina Association of Pharmacists
    • NCPA – National Community Pharmacists Association
    • SNPhA – Student National Pharmaceutical Association

Procedure for obtaining reimbursement:

Step One: Submit names of students intending to travel.

    1. At least 30 days prior to the conference, student names must be submitted to and approved by the curricular & student affairs specialist (Andrew Clapper) in the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs via this email address: pharmacystudentaffairs@unc.edu
      1. For student organizations, names of travelling students should be submitted in one email by the organization president or designate.
      2. For students who are not members of an organization, names should be submitted individually by the student seeking travel reimbursement.

Step Two: Conference travel and attendance.

    1. All students will pay for meeting registration and all associated expenses up front.
    2. Confirmation of attendance and involvement:
      1. Prior to the meeting, student organization leaders, in consultation with organization advisors, will determine which programs or activities students should attend and complete at the meeting and communicate these expectations with travelling students. The organization president or designate will be responsible for ensuring that students seeking reimbursement attend all required meetings and/or sessions.
      2. Students who are not travelling as a member of a student organization, must save and provide original receipts (registration, hotel, travel, etc.) and a copy of the conference program/agenda as part of the reimbursement request process to verify their travel. These students will also be required to submit a written reflection as part of the reimbursement process outlining the sessions attended and what they learned/experienced.

Step Three: Reimbursement Requests

    1. Within 10 business days of returning from the professional meeting, a reimbursement request form must be submitted via this form.
      1. Student organizations will submit one online reimbursement request after confirming/verifying student attendance at the conference. After this list is submitted online, no additional travel reimbursements will be accepted for the meeting.
      2. Students who are not traveling as a member of a student organization will submit an individual reimbursement request online that includes scanned copies of original travel receipts, a scanned copy of the conference program/agenda, and their personal written reflection.

Step Four: Reimbursement and thank you letter

    1. After receiving notification of online reimbursement request, the curricular & student affairs specialist will verify the names of attending students and confirm that they have not previously been awarded a travel stipend for the academic year.
    2. The curricular & student affairs specialist will complete a reimbursement request form and submit it to the Pharmacy Foundation. The Pharmacy Foundation will process the request and mail the check to the requestor.
      1. Student organizations will be provided one reimbursement check and will be responsible for reimbursing individual students at the approved amount.
      2. Students not traveling as part of a student organization will be provided with an individual check from the Pharmacy Foundation.
    3. A “thank you” letter will be written and submitted to the Pharmacy Foundation donor. A copy of the letter should be sent to the Pharmacy Foundation at 194 Finley Golf Course Rd. Suite 106 Chapel Hill, NC 27517.
      1. Student organization presidents or designate will write a thank you letter or postcard from the city where the meeting is held and send it to the donor. The name and address of the donor can be obtained from the curricular & student affairs specialist.
      2. Students not traveling as part of an organization will write a thank you letter or postcard from the city where the meeting is held and send it to the donor. The name and address of the donor can be obtained from the curricular & student affairs specialist.

Travel Reimbursement for the ASHP Clinical Skills Competition Winners and the APhA-ASP National Patient Counseling Competition Winner

Policy

The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Pharmacy Foundation recognize the opportunity for professional development, enhancement of patient care skills, and the ability to positively represent our School on a national level afforded to students selected as local winners of the ASHP Clinical Skills Competition and the APhA-ASP National Patient Counseling Competition. As a result, the Pharmacy Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. provides funds for travel reimbursement for two students representing the School at the ASHP Clinical Skills Competition and one student representing the School at the APhA-ASP National Patient Counseling Competition. Because travel costs vary from year to year depending on the meeting location, the amount awarded for travel reimbursement will be decided annually by the Pharmacy Foundation. The amount reimbursed is typically around $500 per student.

Procedure

The procedure for receiving reimbursement is below.

    1. The student organization president or liaison, in conjunction with the organization adviser, will develop an estimated travel budget (registration, flight, hotel, travel to and from the airport, etc.) and send to the curricular & student affairs specialist, Andrew Clapper, at least fifteen days prior to the meeting or competition. If possible, this budget should be completed prior to the UNC competition so that students will know how much travel reimbursement they can expect to receive if they represent the School (approximately October for ASHP and January for APhA-ASP).
    2. The curricular & student affairs specialist will contact the Pharmacy Foundation to discuss the estimated travel budget.
    3. The Pharmacy Foundation will determine how much travel reimbursement it will provide for each student and this will be communicated to the curricular & student affairs specialist who will then communicate this to the student organization president or liaison and organization advisor.
    4. The students representing the School in these competitions will pay for their travel up front. Within five business days of returning from the meeting, the students will give the receipts from travel to the student services coordinator.
    5. The curricular & student affairs specialist will request travel reimbursement from the Pharmacy Foundation. The reimbursement check will be mailed directly to the student representative at the student’s local address listed in Connect Carolina.
    6. The student should write a thank-you letter to the Pharmacy Foundation. In addition, a thank-you postcard from the city where the meeting is held should be mailed to the donor. The name and address of the donor can be obtained from the student services coordinator.

Fundraising events, donating items for charity, and volunteerism are often promoted at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy by classes (PY1, 2, 3, 4) and student organizations. These efforts are supported and encouraged by the School; however, these activities should stand on their own merit. Offering extra credit in courses should not be assigned based on a student’s participation in fundraising activities, donations to a charity (supplies, money, time, etc.), volunteerism, or participation in club or organization activities. Examples include awarding extra credit for students participating in

  • Dean E. Smith Center clean-ups or other fundraising events,
  • donating supplies for mission trips or relief efforts, and
  • volunteering for a student organization activity.

Students should not ask instructors for extra credit, and instructors are discouraged from offering extra credit in these circumstances.

There are some courses in which service learning is an important component of the course (e.g., spending time at an indigent clinic). This policy does not apply to service-learning opportunities that contribute to meeting the learning goals for the course and are built into the course grade as predefined in the course syllabus.

Fundraising is a vital part of helping each student organization reach its goals. Organizational fundraising occurs throughout the year. As of August 2012, cash will no longer be an acceptable form of payment for any fundraisers or payment collections. The only exception is for fundraisers that charge fees less that $10 (i.e. bake sales, pizza sales, Doses of Franklin, etc.). With these types of fundraisers, the profits must be brought to the Office of Curricular & Student Affairs within 1 business day of the event to be double-counted and confirmed. Any fundraisers using order forms should only accept checks as the form of payment despite the purchase price of the item (i.e. t-shirt orders, etc.). This policy has been implemented to ensure the safety of those involved with any form of payment collection as cash is far more difficult to trace than checks in the event there is a discrepancy amongst two or more parties in regards to payment.

The Graduate & Professional Honor System’s mission is to facilitate every student’s commitment to “academic honesty, personal integrity, and responsible citizenship” consistent with the UNC-Chapel Hill Honor System philosophy. The UNC-Chapel Hill Honor System is a unique self-governing body led and administered by students, in consultation with faculty and staff, which aims to hold their peers to a high standard of conduct, honor, and integrity. The Honor System has both an educational and an administrative responsibility to foster honor and integrity while administering the Honor Code by addressing alleged violations. The Pharmacy Honor System strives to comply with these ideals and protect the interests of the students, faculty, and staff and the integrity of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. In collaboration with the faculty, staff, and students of the School, the Graduate & Professional Honor System seeks to promote a community in which all students may learn and conduct themselves with honor and integrity.

“These goals can only be achieved in a setting in which intellectual honesty and personal integrity are highly valued; other individuals are trusted, respected, and fairly treated; and the responsibility for articulating and maintaining high standards is widely shared.”

— An excerpt from the preamble of the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance

Premise for the Graduate & Professional Honor System

“The question is not whether the University can discipline you, but whether you can discipline yourselves”

— Edward Kidder Graham
UNC President, 1914-1918

 

The Graduate & Professional honor System is a process designed to respond to allegations of student misconduct. While there are numerous similarities between the honor system and a court of law, the system is not a criminal court.

The purpose of this system is to protect the academic process and the learning community and to uphold the values of academic and personal integrity. The system also strives to uphold the accused student’s right to due process.

Upon enrollment in the University, all students, regardless of their status, agreed to uphold and abide by the Honor Code. This means that they agree to accept the consequences of their actions, should they violate the code.

The University places a high value on student self-governance. As a result the system is largely operated by students with significant support from the faculty and the administration. All sanctions are enacted by the Office of the Dean of Students on behalf of the administration.

Philosophy

Students’ Commitment

Carolina students pledge to maintain ideals of academic honesty, personal integrity, and responsible citizenship. These ideals are embodied in the Honor Code set forth in the Instrument, with the support of students, faculty, and staff. When a student applies to Carolina, he undertakes a commitment to the principles embodied in the Honor Code.

University Interests

The University endeavors to instill in each student a love of learning, a commitment to fair and honorable conduct, and respect for the safety and welfare of others. It also strives to protect the community from those who, for whatever reason, do not embody these values in their conduct, and to protect the integrity of the University and its property for the benefit of all.

Educational and Other Activities

The activities of students outside the classroom influence the educational process and learning environment, just as the intellectual atmosphere of the campus contributes to students’ growth and development. Many forms of nonacademic conduct, as well as all facets of the academic process, are therefore areas of proper concern and regulation by the University community.

Responsible Exercise of Freedom

The guiding principle of University regulation of conduct is that of the responsible exercise of freedom. Students should be accorded the greatest possible degree of self-determination correlative with the acceptance of the full responsibility for their conduct and the consequences of their actions.

Chancellor’s Responsibilities

The Chancellor remains solely responsible for all matters of student discipline. Nevertheless, the Chancellor has traditionally shared the responsibility of setting basic policy concerning student conduct and applying overarching requirements in individual cases with students and the faculty in order to achieve the University’s underlying goals.

University and Broader Community

The University has a special interest in assuring that students refrain from academic misconduct, respect the safety and welfare of members of the University community, and protect its institutional integrity and resources. The standards for student conduct and the means of enforcement set forth in the Instrument are adopted in furtherance of University interests and serve to supplement, rather than substitute, for the enforcement of the civil and criminal law applicable at large. Therefore it is not double jeopardy for the University to sanction conduct that is also sanctioned under local, state, or federal law.


The Honor Code

Carolina students pledge to maintain the ideals of academic integrity, personal responsibility, and responsible citizenship. These ideals are embodied in the Honor Code (Code) as set forth in the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance (Instrument), with the support of students, faculty, and staff. When a student applies to Carolina, he/she commits to the principles embodied in the Code. As part of your commitment to the ideals valued as a member of the Carolina community, it is every student’s responsibility to educate and familiarize themselves with their responsibilities under the Code.

Rights & Responsibilities

Rights

All students who are alleged to have violated the Honor Code are guaranteed certain basic rights designed to ensure a fair hearing. These rights include access to any evidence against them and the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty:

  1. Information & Informed Choices
  2. Presumption of Innocence
  3. Counsel
  4. Fair hearing
  5. Refusal of Self-Incrimination
  6. Evidence & Witnesses
  7. Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt
  8. Appeals & Rehearings

A listing of students’ procedural rights and explanations can be found in Section IV.A of the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance.

Responsibilities

All Carolina students are expected to refrain from lying, cheating, and stealing. The Instrument of Student Judicial Governance sets forth additional responsibilities, many of which are set forth in the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance, Appendix A, which can be summarized in four main points:

  1. Obey and support the enforcement of the Honor Code
  2. Refrain from lying, cheating, or stealing
  3. Conduct themselves so as not to impair significantly the welfare or the educational opportunities of others in the University community
  4. Refrain from conduct that impairs or may impair the capacity of University and associated personnel to perform their duties, manage resources, protect the safety and welfare of members of the University community, and maintain the integrity of the University

These responsibilities are the minimum expected of members of the Student Body; all students are expected to actively support and protect the ideals of the Honor System at Carolina. These responsibilities must not only be met, but exceeded, for Carolina’s Honor System to continue to thrive.

Examples of Offenses of the Honor Code

  • Academic cheating including but not limited to unauthorized copying and collaboration, or use of notes or books on examinations
  • Plagiarism:  defined as the deliberate or reckless representation of another’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own
  • Furnishing false information
  • Forgery or other misuse of University documents
  • Damage, theft or other misuse of University property
  • Hazing
  • Inflicting physical injury upon a person
  • Sexual assault
  • Harassment
  • Carrying a weapon
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession of illegal substances
  • DUI
  • Aiding or abetting any of the above offenses

The Instrument of Student Judicial Governance

Student self-governance has played an integral part in the proper development of the UNC student community since the late 19th century. By 1890, matters of academic dishonesty and social misconduct were handled by the students of the university. Continued evolution of both the university and its student body necessitated the creation and implementation of our first student constitution in 1946, establishing five student courts. Continued evaluation of our process and disapproval of the system among the students in the 1950s and 1960s prompted reforms and in 1974, The Instrument of Student Judicial Governance was adopted.

The Instrument, as it has come to be known, serves as the University’s definitive statement on student disciplinary governance. It delineates the Honor Code and includes all structures and procedures of our Honor System here at Carolina. Although one may view this document as a set of rules that are to be followed while here at Carolina, the purpose of The Instrument is to instill values and character in the students at UNC. While this governing text does empower the students to take action in situations where a student neglects or abuses responsibilities addressed therein, it serves more as a tool to instill character in our students, and should be thought of as a description of the type of students found here at Carolina; honest, responsible, trustworthy, and above all, individuals with remarkable character and leadership.

You may obtain a copy of the Instrument on the Web at http://instrument.unc.edu.

Student Responsibilities

The Honor Code makes integrity a personal matter and calls upon students to act in ways that epitomize responsibility, respect for others and respect for their goal of achieving an education. It also calls upon all members of the University, students and faculty alike, to hold others in the community to the same standards of honest, responsible conduct.

The Instrument of Student Judicial Governance enumerates student responsibilities under the Code:

  1. Conduct all academic work within the letter and spirit of the Honor Code, which prohibits the giving or receiving of unauthorized aid in all academic processes.
  2. Consult with faculty and other sources to clarify the meaning of plagiarism; to learn the recognized techniques of proper attribution of sources used in the preparation of written work; and to identify allowable resource materials or aids to be used during examination or in completion of any graded work.
  3. Sign a pledge on all graded academic work certifying that no unauthorized assistance has been received or given in the completion of the work.
  4. Comply with faculty regulations designed to reduce the possibility of cheating — such as removing unauthorized materials or aids from the room and protecting one’s own examination paper from the view of others.
  5. Maintain the confidentiality of examinations by divulging no information concerning an examination, directly or indirectly, to another student yet to write that same examination.
  6. Treat all members of the University community with respect and fairness.
  7. Report any instance in which reasonable grounds exist to believe that a student has given or received unauthorized aid in graded work or in other respects violated the Honor Code. Such report should be made to the Office of the Student Attorney General, the Office of the Dean of Students, or other appropriate officer or official of their college or school.
  8. Cooperate with the Office of the Student Attorney General and the defense counsel in the investigation and hearing of any incident of alleged violation, including the giving of testimony when called upon. Nothing herein shall be construed to contravene a student’s rights.

Honor System Structure

The Honor System consists of three branches: the Attorney General’s Staff, the Honor Court, and Honor System Outreach. The Office of the Attorney General receives reports of suspected violations and makes a charge decision. It is the responsibility of the Attorney General’s staff to work with the accused student and reporting party to gather and prepare all relevant material for the case.

During the Honor Court hearing, members of the Attorney General’s staff act as either defense or investigative counsels representing the accused student or the University community, respectively. The Attorney General’s staff, accused student, and reporting party present their evidence and testimony to the Honor Court members Honor Court members are responsible for hearing alleged violations of the Honor Code.

During these cases, Honor Court members deliberate on a judgment of guilty vs. not guilty and appropriate sanctions, if necessary. Honor System Outreach is responsible for promoting the ideals of honor and integrity throughout the University community. Members of Outreach work to educate professors and students about their rights and responsibilities as outlined under the Instrument.

Honor System Staff

Attorney General and Cabinet

As outlined in the Instrument, the Attorney General is responsible for the following:

  • Recruiting, appointing, training, certifying, and overseeing the members of the Attorney General’s staff.
  • Managing the day-to-day Honor System administrative tasks
  • Reviewing and investigating alleged violations of the Honor Code
  • Formulating and bringing charges against students as well as advising students concerning their rights and responding to appeals
  • Contributing to cooperative efforts to strengthen the campus Honor System.

The Attorney General also meets on a regular basis with his or her Cabinet and staff members to discuss current issues facing the Honor System and to ensure that counsels and associates are fully prepared to handle each case appropriately.

The Cabinet of the Attorney General is appointed by each Attorney General. The Deputies aid the Attorney General in all of his/her capacities, primarily in charge decisions and initial meetings. The Chief of Staff oversees logistics and communications with the Staff, primarily in planning and leading recruitment, training and the bi-monthly meetings. The Senior Associates oversee the Managing Associates, deal with postponed cases, handle difficult cases and make changes to the training manual as needed.

Counsels

As outlined in the manual, counsels work as “lawyers” in the Honor System in that they help to prepare the case and represent the reporting party or the student in the Honor Court hearings. The investigative counsel is responsible for presenting a case to the Honor Court that supports the charge made by the Student Attorney General. On the other side, the defense counsel assists the accused student in presenting his/her case.  Both counsels provide complete explanations of the Honor System and the rights of the student and the reporting party as well as assist their respective parties in the preparation and presentation of his/her case before the Honor Court. Membership includes a diverse group of students from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. Counsels also meet regularly with the Attorney General and Cabinet, Honor Court, and Outreach to ensure cooperation within the Honor System and to develop ways to promote the Honor Code throughout the campus community.

Chair

As outlined in the Instrument, the Chair is responsible for the following:

  • Recruiting, nominating, training, certifying and overseeing Honor Court members
  • Managing the day-to-day Honor Court administrative tasks
  • Contributing to cooperative efforts to strengthen the campus Honor System.

The Chair also meets on a regular basis with his/her Vice-Chairs and Honor Court members to discuss current issues facing the Honor Court and to ensure that members are fully prepared to handle each case appropriately.

Vice-Chairs

Honor Court Vice-Chairs are primarily responsible for chairing and overseeing individual Honor Court cases. The Vice-Chairs maintain order within the hearing, guide deliberations among Honor Court members, and construct a rationale detailing the Honor Court’s reasoning for its judgment and sanction(s), when appropriate. Vice-Chairs also meet regularly with the Chair and spearhead projects to improve the functionality of the Honor Court and to better educate students of the Honor Code and paths to success as a UNC student.

Honor Court Members

Honor Court members are responsible for hearing possible violations of the Honor Code and deliberating upon judgments and sanctions, if necessary. Membership includes a diverse group of students from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. Honor Court members also meet regularly with the Chair, Vice-Chairs, Attorney General’s Staff, and Outreach to ensure cooperation within the Honor System and to develop ways to promote the Honor Code throughout the campus community.

Honor System Procedures

Suspected Violation

If a member of the University community suspects a violation of the Honor Code has occurred, he or she is encouraged to speak with the student to provide the opportunity for the student to explain the behavior. If the student does not provide a satisfactory explanation for his or her conduct, the witness to the conduct should report the matter to the Honor System Office or the Office of Student Conduct.

How the Honor System Receives Reports

The reporting procedure is slightly different for students and faculty members. Faculty who suspect an academic violation must file a report and may inform the student of their intention to file a report. If the instructor and the student both agree to meet, they engage in an informal meeting wherein the instructor may share his concerns and the student will have the opportunity to provide additional information. Students accused of an academic violation may engage in this informal process if they so choose, after having reviewed their basic rights under the Honor Code. In order to ensure that students receive fair and equal treatment and sanctions are consistently applied, the faculty has agreed that instructors may not sanction students for Honor Code violations outside of the established process. If the parties meet, the instructor may determine: 1) the student admitted the violation and the instructor would like to recommend a sanction; 2) the instructor does not have enough information and recommends a more thorough investigation; or 3) the instructor recommends that the Student Attorney General not charge the student.

Students should report violations using the online form, directly to Office of the Honor System either in person at SASB North, Suite 0103, by email to honor@unc.edu, or by phone at 919.966.4084.

The Investigation

After each report is received by the Office of the Honor System, the Student Attorney General conducts a preliminary investigation to determine whether the alleged conduct constitutes an offense under the Honor Code and whether a reasonable basis exists to refer the matter for a hearing before the Honor Court. In making his or her decision, the Attorney General may discuss the report with the reporting party and any witnesses, review any written material, and discuss the matter with the accused student. Students are not required to answer any questions that may be self-incriminating. Anything the student says to the Attorney General or staff during the investigation may be used in an Honor Court hearing if the student is charged. If the Student Attorney General finds that a reasonable basis exists, he or she will charge the student and schedule an Honor Court hearing. A decision to charge a student with a violation does not mean that the student has been found guilty, only that there is enough evidence to support the allegation and warrant a hearing.

If the Attorney General’s investigation does not lead to charges, the matter is closed and neither the reporting party nor the Honor Court may impose sanctions.

The Hearing

The accused student is provided at least five business days’ notice prior to the hearing in order to provide adequate time for preparation. The Honor System office will provide the student with a written Notice to Appear at the hearing, specifying the date and time of the hearing. Hearings are held in closed session, meaning they are not open to the public, unless the student requests an open hearing in writing in advance of the hearing. Open hearings are open to the public and the press in accordance with the North Carolina Open Meetings Law. All hearings are recorded to preserve a record in case of appeal. In addition to the court members, the accused student, the defense counsel, and the investigator are present throughout all phases of the hearing. In cases involving certain offenses, the reporting party may remain throughout the hearing.  The Honor Court is responsible for rendering a verdict on the case. In order to render a guilty verdict, the Honor Court must find the student guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. If the accused student is found guilty, the Honor Court is also responsible for determining appropriate sanctions.

Sanctioning

If the Honor Court finds a student has violated the Honor Code, it will apply a sanction that reflects the University’s goals to educate the student, protect the community, and redress any harm caused by the student’s act. Honor Courts may levy educational sanctions, such as redoing an assignment or completing an assignment on academic honesty or citation methods. Sanctions are meant to be flexible, educational, and considerate of the unique circumstances of the violation and the student. For a more comprehensive look at sanctions, please consult section III of the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance.

Post-Hearing

Regardless of the outcome of Honor System proceedings, students are required to conduct a Post Hearing meeting with the Judicial Programs Officer.  During the Post Hearing meeting the Judicial Programs Officer discusses the current disposition of the student’s discipline case.

Students found responsible for an Honor Code violation will discuss the determination of the Court, disciplinary sanctions imposed, the appeals process and the maintenance of the discipline record. Students who wish to appeal a determination of the Court may do so on limited grounds. To file an appeal, the student must submit a petition of appeal to the Judicial Programs Officer within five business days of receiving the Honor Court’s rationale. This statement of appeal must include all of the permissible grounds upon which the case is to be appealed and all facts supporting those grounds. If the appeal request does not contain sufficient facts or does not specify the grounds, it may be deemed insufficient and rejected.


Steps to Report a Suspected Violation of the Code

Possible Methods of Reporting a Violation

Process of Determining a Violation

  1. If you are unsure whether a situation needs to be reported, consult with the Graduate and Professional Student Attorney General (gpsag@unc.edu).
  2. You may confront the student with your suspicion and ask him/her to self-report. Regardless of the student’s response, you are obligated to report possible violations.
  3. Prepare a written letter explaining what led you to believe a violation occurred, and include ALL relevant facts. Deliver your letter of complaint via campus mail, registered mail, or e-mail to the Graduate & Professional Student Attorney General. Your name must be included; anonymous reports are not submissable.
  4. Collect and maintain any evidence.
  5. A Deputy Attorney General will contact you to set up an appointment. At the meeting, please be prepared to provide the relevant evidence and discuss the situation.
  6. The assigned Deputy Attorney General will decide if sufficient evidence exists to warrant a hearing of the student court.

Graduate & Professional Honor System Representatives for 2015-2016 School Year

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is the deliberate or reckless representation of another’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own without attribution in connection with submission of academic work, whether graded or otherwise.”  This definition appears in The Instrument of Judicial Governance (II.B.1).

Ignorance of procedures of attribution, carelessness in the manner of attribution, negligence, laziness, and personal pressures upon the defendant in the preparation of the assignment have no bearing upon the determination of a charge of plagiarism unless these circumstances contribute to the intention to deceive and thus, to cheat.

The following examples are provided for your further clarification and understanding of the meaning of plagiarism.

Example 1: From Arnold Springholz, Language of Bees (London: J. Kell, 1978), p.411

‘Although Frisch wrote his explanation of the dance of the honey bees in the 1930s, he was not recognized by the Nobel Prize Committee for his discovery until the early 1970s.’

From a student’s paper:

‘Frisch wrote his explanation of the dance of the honey bees in the 1930s, but did not receive the Nobel Prize until forty years later (Springholz 41 1)’

Is the citation necessary? Yes

Is there plagiarism here? Yes, because the paraphrase is really a direct quotation without the quotation marks, not a restatement in the student’s own words and word order.

Example 2: From ‘The Value of Research,’ Newsweek. 18 Jan. 1971, p.37

‘Though few people would disagree that there is an ever-present need for basic laboratory research, few of them realize that even in the more theoretical areas of science, such as mathematics or psychology, rewards, in the form of useful and sometimes tangible results, are obtained.’

From a student’s paper:

‘Few people argue that there is a need for basic laboratory research, but few of them realized the results that are obtained from such theoretical areas as math or psychology.’

Which of the 3 types of documentation has the student used? Paraphrase.

Should the student have cited the source? Yes.

Is there plagiarism here? Yes; the student has copied phrases directly from the source without quotation marks.

Example 3: From Ernst Gruner, ‘The Life of Edward Bron’ (Oslo: Oskar Malm, 1957), p.89

‘When Bron first arrived at the university, he was, as he later wrote, ‘introduced to the immensely kind but stern old gentleman, Hans Borstkam, ‘ who would eventually turn the young student’s interest from the medicine to economic theory.’

From a student’s paper on Hans Borstkam:

A student of Professor Borstkam’s once described him in writing as “immensely kind but stern ” (Guner 89)

Which of the three types of documentation has the student used? Direct quotes.

Is the citation necessary? Yes. Is there plagiarism here? No.

Example 4: From Leon J. Besser, A Liberal Education for America (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1939), p.l6

‘But Harvard University, founded in the woods outside Boston in 1636 and thus America’s oldest institution of higher learning, had a much more narrowed purpose in its earlier years, when it was simply a single log house in which the Massachusetts Indians were taught to read the Bible.’

From a UNC student’s paper in an education class:

Harvard, America’s oldest institution of higher learning, was founded 160 years before North Carolina opened the first state university.

Should the student have cited the source? Probably, since there are dates involved; however, for this audience the dates may be common knowledge.

Is there plagiarism here? Yes, copying a phrase directly without using quotation marks is plagiarism; a successful paraphrase would have changed both wording and syntax.

Example 5: From Walter Allen, The English Novel (New York: Dutton, 1954), p.223

‘Wuthering Heights is the most remarkable novel in English. It is perfect, and perfect in the rarest way: it is the complete bodying forth of an intensely individual apprehension of the nature of man and life. That is to say, the content is strange enough, indeed baffling enough, while the artistic expression of it is flawless.’

From a student’s paper:

According to Walter Allen, Wuthering Heights is chiefly notable for its “intensely individual apprehension of the nature of man and life.”(223). This makes its artistic expression combined with its odd yet compelling content to form the most notable, even remarkable, novel in English.

The student has cited a source from the direct quotation here. Is this adequate documentation? No, the source material in the second sentence also needs attribution.

Is there plagiarism here? Yes

Example 6: From James B. Kelly’s ‘Thinking About the Unthinkable,’ Time 29 March 1982, p.10

‘The [nuclear freeze] movement is far more broadly based; it includes more bishops than hooligans, doctors and lawyers with impeccable Establishment credentials, arch conservatives as well as diehard liberals, and such knowledgeable experts as retired Admiral Noel Gayler, former director of the supersede National Security Agency, and former SALT g Negotiator Paul Warnke.”

From a student’s paper:

The movement for a nuclear arms freeze is slowly gaining support from people in all walks of life. James B. Kelly notes that these people include professionals, religious and military leaders, and former government officials (1O).

Which of the three types of documentation has the student used? Summary.

Is the citation necessary? Yes. Is there plagiarism here? No.

 

Proper Referencing Format for Information Sources

Downloaded from JAMA WEeb site; published: 1997;277:927-934

References should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they are first mentioned in the text. Identify

references in text, tables, and legends by Arabic numerals in parentheses. References cited only in tables or in legends to figures should be numbered in accordance with the sequence established by the first identification in the text of the particular table or figure.

Use the style of the examples below, which are based on the formats used by the NLM in Index Medicus. The titles of journals should be abbreviated according to the style used in Index Medicus. Consult the List of Journals Indexed

in Index Medicus, published annually as a separate publication by the library and as a list in the January issue of Index Medicus. The list can also be obtained through the library’s Web site (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/). Avoid using abstracts as references. References to papers accepted but not yet published should be designated as “in press” or “forthcoming”; authors should obtain written permission to cite such papers as well as verification that they have been accepted for publication. Information from manuscripts submitted but not accepted should be cited in the text as “unpublished observations” with written permission from the source.

Avoid citing a personal communication unless it provides essential information not available from a public source,

in which case the name of the person and date of communication should be cited in parentheses in the text. For scientific articles, authors should obtain written permission and confirmation of accuracy from the source of a personal communication.

The references must be verified by the author against the original documents. The Uniform Requirements style (the Vancouver style) is based largely on an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard style adapted by the

NLM for its databases. Notes have been added where Vancouver style differs from the style now used by NLM.

Articles in Journals

1. Standard journal article

List the first six authors followed by et al.

(Note: NLM now lists up through 25 authors; if there are more than 25 authors, NLM lists the first 24, then the last author, then et al.)

Vega KJ, Pina I, Krevsky B. Heart transplantation is associated with an increased risk for pancreatobiliary disease. Ann Intern Med 1996 Jun 1;124(11):980-3.

As an option, if a journal carries continuous pagination throughout a volume (as many medical journals do) the month and issue number may be omitted.

(Note: For consistency, this option is used throughout the examples in Uniform Requirements. NLM does not use this option.)

Vega KJ, Pina I, Krevsky B. Heart transplantation is associated with an increased risk for pancreatobiliary disease.

Ann Intern Med 1996;124:980-3.

More than six authors:

Parkin DM, Clayton D, Black RJ, Masuyer E, Friedl HP, Ivanov E, et al. Childhood—leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: 5 year follow-up. Br J Cancer 1996;73:1006-12.

2. Organization as author

The Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Clinical exercise stress testing. Safety and performance guidelines. Med J Aust 1996;164:282-4.

3. No author given

Cancer in South Africa [editorial]. S Afr Med J 1994;84:15.

4. Article not in English

(Note: NLM translates the title to English, encloses the translation in square brackets, and adds an abbreviated language designator.)

Ryder TE, Haukeland EA, Solhaug JH. Bilateral infrapatellar seneruptur hos tidligere frisk kvinne. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 1996;116:41-2.

5. Volume with supplement

Shen HM, Zhang QF. Risk assessment of nickel carcinogenicity and occupational lung cancer. Environ Health Perspect 1994;102 Suppl 1:275-82.

6. Issue with supplement

Payne DK, Sullivan MD, Massie MJ. Women’s psychological reactions to breast cancer. Semin Oncol 1996;23(1 Suppl 2):89-97.

7. Volume with part

Ozben T, Nacitarhan S, Tuncer N. Plasma and urine sialic acid in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Ann Clin Biochem 1995;32(Pt 3):303-6.

8. Issue with par

Poole GH, Mills SM. One hundred consecutive cases of flap lacerations of the leg in ageing patients. N Z Med J 1994;107(986 Pt 1):377-8.

9. Issue with no volume

Turan I, Wredmark T, Fellander-Tsai L. Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis in rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Orthop 1995;(320):110-4.

10. No issue or volume

Browell DA, Lennard TW. Immunologic status of the cancer patient and the effects of blood transfusion on antitumor responses. Curr Opin Gen Surg 1993:325-33.

11. Pagination in Roman numerals

Fisher GA, Sikic BI. Drug resistance in clinical oncology and hematology. Introduction. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 1995 Apr;9(2):xi-xii.

12. Type of article indicated as needed

Enzensberger W, Fischer PA. Metronome in Parkinson’s disease [letter]. Lancet 1996;347:1337. Clement J, De Bock R. Hematological complications of hantavirus nephropathy (HVN) [abstract]. Kidney Int 1992;42:1285.

13. Article containing retraction

Garey CE, Schwarzman AL, Rise ML, Seyfried TN. Ceruloplasmin gene defect associated with epilepsy in EL mice [retraction of Garey CE, Schwarzman AL, Rise ML, Seyfried TN. In: Nat Genet 1994;6:426-31]. Nat Genet 1995;11:104.

14. Article retracted

Liou GI, Wang M, Matragoon S. Precocious IRBP gene expression during mouse development [retracted in Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1994;35:3127]. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1994;35:1083-8.

15. Article with published erratum

Hamlin JA, Kahn AM. Herniography in symptomatic patients following inguinal hernia repair [published erratum appears in West J Med 1995;162:278]. West J Med 1995;162:28-31.

Books and Other Monographs

(Note: Previous Vancouver style incorrectly had a comma rather than a semicolon between the publisher and the date.)

16. Personal author

Ringsven MK, Bond D. Gerontology and leadership skills for nurses. 2nd ed. Albany (NY): Delmar Publishers; 1996.

17. Editor, compiler as author

Norman IJ, Redfern SJ, editors. Mental health care for elderly people. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 1996.

18. Organization as author and publisher

Institute of Medicine (US). Looking at the future of the Medicaid program. Washington: The Institute; 1992.

19. Chapter in a book

(Note: Previous Vancouver style had a colon rather than a p before pagination.)

Phillips SJ, Whisnant JP. Hypertension and stroke. In: Laragh JH, Brenner BM, editors. Hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. 2nd ed. New York: Raven Press; 1995. p. 465-78.

20. Conference proceedings

Kimura J, Shibasaki H, editors. Recent advances in clinical neurophysiology. Proceedings of the 10th International Congress of EMG and Clinical Neurophysiology; 1995 Oct 15-19; Kyoto, Japan. Amsterdam: Elsevier; 1996.

21. Conference paper

Bengtsson S, Solheim BG. Enforcement of data protection, privacy and security in medical informatics. In: Lun KC, Degoulet P, Piemme TE, Rienhoff O, editors. MEDINFO 92. Proceedings of the 7th World Congress on Medical Informatics; 1992 Sep 6-10; Geneva, Switzerland. Amsterdam: North-Holland; 1992. p. 1561-5.

22. Scientific or technical report

Issued by funding/sponsoring agency:

Smith P, Golladay K. Payment for durable medical equipment billed during skilled nursing facility stays. Final report. Dallas (TX): Dept. of Health and Human Services (US), Office of Evaluation and Inspections; 1994 Oct. Report No.: HHSIGOEI69200860.

Issued by performing agency: Field MJ, Tranquada RE, Feasley JC, editors. Health services research: work force and educational issues. Washington: National Academy Press; 1995. Contract No.: AHCPR282942008. Sponsored by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research.

23. Dissertation

Kaplan SJ. Post-hospital home health care: the elderly’s access and utilization [dissertation]. St. Louis (MO): Washington Univ.; 1995.

24. Patent

Larsen CE, Trip R, Johnson CR, inventors; Novoste Corporation, assignee. Methods for procedures related to the electrophysiology of the heart. US patent 5,529,067. 1995 Jun 25.

Other Published Material

25. Newspaper article

Lee G. Hospitalizations tied to ozone pollution: study estimates 50,000 admissions annually. The Washington Post 1996 Jun 21;Sect. A:3 (col. 5).

26. Audiovisual material

HIV+/AIDS: the facts and the future [videocassette]. St. Louis (MO): Mosby-Year Book; 1995.

27. Legal material

Public Law:

Preventive Health Amendments of 1993, Pub. L. No. 103-183, 107 Stat. 2226 (Dec. 14, 1993).

Unenacted bill:

Medical Records Confidentiality Act of 1995, S. 1360, 104th Cong., 1st Sess. (1995).

Code of Federal Regulations: Informed Consent, 42 C.F.R. Sect. 441.257 (1995).

Hearing:

Increased Drug Abuse: the Impact on the Nation’s Emergency Rooms: Hearings Before the Subcomm. on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the House Comm. On Government Operations, 103rd Cong., 1st Sess. (May 26, 1993).

28. Map

North Carolina. Tuberculosis rates per 100,000 population, 1990 [demographic map]. Raleigh: North Carolina Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Div. of Epidemiology; 1991.

29. Book of the Bible

The Holy Bible. King James version. Grand Rapids (MI): Zondervan Publishing House; 1995. Ruth 3:1-18.

30. Dictionary and similar references

Stedman’s medical dictionary. 26th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 1995. Apraxia; p. 119-20.

31. Classical material

The Winter’s Tale: act 5, scene 1, lines 13-16. The complete works of William Shakespeare. London: Rex; 1973.

Unpublished Material

32. In press:

(Note: NLM prefers “forthcoming” because not all items will be printed.)

Leshner AI. Molecular mechanisms of cocaine addiction. N Engl J Med. In press 1996.

Electronic Material

33. Journal article in electronic format

Morse SS. Factors in the emergence of infectious diseases. Emerg Infect Dis [serial online] 1995 Jan-Mar [cited 1996 Jun 5]; 1(1):[24 screens]. Available from: URL: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/eid.htm

34. Monograph in electronic format

CDI, clinical dermatology illustrated [monograph on CD-ROM]. Reeves JRT, Maibach H. CMEA Multimedia Group, producers. 2nd ed. Version 2.0. San Diego: CMEA; 1995.

35. Computer file

Hemodynamics III: the ups and downs of hemodynamics [computer program]. Version 2.2. Orlando (FL): Computerized Educational Systems; 1993.